sanitarian

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sanitarian

 [san″ĭ-tar´e-an]
a public health worker skilled in surveillance of food services, water and air pollution, and sewage planning and control.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

san·i·tar·i·an

(san'i-tār'ē-ăn),
One who is skilled in sanitation and public health.
[L. sanitas, health, fr. sanus, sound]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sanitarian

(săn′ĭ-târ′ē-ən)
n.
A public health or sanitation expert.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

san·i·tar·i·an

(san'i-tar'ē-ăn)
One who is skilled in sanitation and public health.
[L. sanitas, health, fr. sanus, sound]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In the meantime, sanitarians will continue working with the facility as needed to provide guidance on safe food practices, officials said.
As a Diplomate of the American Academy of Sanitarians (AAS), I know the value of membership in this prestigious organization along with the benefits of belonging to the Academy.
ADH sanitarians inspected each prison's kitchen and dining facilities after receiving reports of illness.
New PC technology has lead to the deployment of convertible tablets allowing the sanitarians in the field to constantly be connected to E-Health using a wireless card.
Curious students can explore topics of interest in greater detail through vignettes presented by an epidemiologist, laboratorian, or sanitarian (i.e., one of three professionals frequently involved in investigating infectious disease outbreaks) (i.e., EXPLORE WITH AN EXPERT vignettes).
Her compendium of the variety of devices available to homeowners in the period from 1840-1869 is impressive, as is her review of the 1870-1890 literature from sanitarians who sought to reform plumbing in order to improve health.
For at least two decades, he says, "sanitarians [sanitation inspectors] out there have been telling us to use plastic cutting boards, even though they had no evidence that plastic was better."
Included are ecologists, ergonomists, health and regulatory inspectors, health physicists, industrial hygienists, pollution control engineers, public health microbiologists, safety professionals, and sanitarians. You could no doubt think of others, but these specialists have traditionally been looked to for expertise in this field.
This ability is regardless of whether they call themselves sanitarians, environmental health specialists, industrial hygienists, or any other related title.
In addition to serving as the 2008 president of the West Virginia Public Health Association, Bayer was chair of the West Virginia Board of Registration for Sanitarians and previously served as president of the West Virginia Association of Sanitarians.