sanguine

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sanguine

 [sang´gwin]
1. plethoric.
2. ardent; hopeful.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

san·guine

(sang'gwin),
1. Synonym(s): plethoric
2. Formerly, denoting a temperament characterized by a light, fair complexion, full pulse, good digestion, optimistic outlook, and a quick but not lasting temper. Synonym(s): sanguineous (3)
[L. sanguineus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sanguine

(săng′gwĭn)
adj.
a. Of the color of blood; red.
b. Of a healthy reddish color; ruddy: a sanguine complexion.

san′guine·ly adv.
san′guine·ness, san·guin′i·ty n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

san·guine

(sang'gwin)
1. Synonym(s): plethoric.
2. Optimistic or cheerful.
Synonym(s): sanguineous (3) .
[L. sanguineus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sanguine

Of a ruddy complexion.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Article II of the Constitution gives the president the power to grant "Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment." In Federalist 74, Alexander Hamilton emphasized that "humanity and good policy conspire to dictate, that the benign prerogative of pardoning should be as little as possible fettered or embarrassed." Without that discretion, "justice would wear a countenance too sanguinely and cruel."
(33) Such a question is necessarily historical, for to sketch an answer we must delve into the intellectual and institutional evolution of the methods employed today so sanguinely. In so doing, we witness the methods and theoretical endeavors that were overlooked, sidelined, and suppressed, and furthermore why this occurred, and this interpretative process can consequently help us to comprehend the dynamics of conceptual change and dominance.
By contrast, French's My Summer with George concludes somewhat more sanguinely. Hermione, relinquishing her imaginary "relationship" with George, concedes that she has projected onto an unsuitable man amorous fantasies not too far removed from those that constitute her own formulaic romance fictions.
Not too sanguinely, the IMF man in Jakarta and the government of President Abdurrahman Wahid squabbled over the current policy direction.
Martz more sanguinely assumes that modernist literary prophets, however select their original audience might have been, might make a positive, redemptive difference in any reader's life--but only if they steer clear of "politics" in a narrow sense.
The commission's brochure, "Facts About the Civil War," spoke of "the Starting Line-ups" for the Union and Confederate forces, as if baseball's World Series (already a highlight of televised life) were the subject and, as Kazin and Isserman comment, "included neither the word 'Negro' nor the word 'slavery.'" "We're not emphasizing Emancipation," said director Betts sanguinely.
An article titled "When Mega-Mergers Are Mega-Bust" in The New York Times ran, "With industrial regulation out of fashion, even the largest mergers are greeted sanguinely by the stock market - and Washington," but then concluded that "many [economists] now doubt that huge mergers will increase productivity."
In a separate front-page article, he rather sanguinely added: "Gang members do not reject such a transformation" (HSB, July 5, 1991: A1).
But it is hoped, perhaps sanguinely, to increase this to as much as 2.5 million bags a year by the close of the century.
bureaucracy did not respond as sanguinely to other cases.(30) In a case on paving equipment, a panel reviewed an ITA complaint accusing a Canadian company of selling its goods at less than fair value.
As the above analysis attempts to show, however, Peacham's words may be only superficially regarded (and in the face of all 'rhetorical' evidence) as an 'affirmation' or 'equation'; but Toft's sanguinely prescriptive tone glosses over the manifest unreliability of Peacham's tantalizing sprezzatura as a guide to performance practice, either during the early modern period or in the twentieth century.
As Athenagoras more sanguinely observes, [Greek Text Omitted] belongs to those who fail to share your own [Greek Text Omitted] (Legatio 14.7).