rat

(redirected from sand rat)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to sand rat: Psammomys obesus

rat

(rat),
A rodent of the genus Rattus (family Muridae), involved in the spread of some diseases, including bubonic plague.

rat

(răt)
n.
a. Any of various long-tailed rodents resembling mice but larger, especially one of the genus Rattus.
b. Any of various animals similar to one of these long-tailed rodents.

RAT

Abbreviation for:
radiation therapy
recombinant human antithrombin
Remuneration And Terms (of service committee)
rheumatoid arthritis test
right atrial tachycardia

rat

Infectious disease A rodent, genus Rattus, which is a vector and/or reservoir of disease–eg, Bunyaviridae, black plague, rat-bite fever Vox populi A dishonorable person. See Lab rat, Weasel.

rat

(rat)
A rodent of the genus Rattus, a widespread predator and pest that attacks wild and domestic animals, consumes or damages crops and stored foodstuffs, and is involved in transmission of diseases (e.g., intestinal parasites, plague, typhus, rat-bite fever) to humans; laboratory rats belong to albino strains of the Norway rat, R. norvegicus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lipha will collaborate to develop pharmaceuticals for the treatment of obesity based on the gene discoveries from the Israeli sand rat model.
Professor Collier said: "Our breakthrough resulted from studies examining gene expression profiles in the hypothalamus of a range of lean and obese sand rats. We found that beacon was present in rats with higher body fat and body weight.
Fat sand rats live in undergound burrows in the deserts of Israel and other countries in the Middle East.
In contrast, strains with identical gltA sequences were isolated from 2 different animal species, such as greater Egyptian jerboas and lesser Egyptian jerboas, Siberian chipmunks and Hokkaido squirrels, and fat-tailed gerbils and fat sand rats. These findings suggest that some Bartonella species have a wide host range and may be transmitted horizontally by some blood-sucking arthropod vectors with low host specificity.
oleaster leaves on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in obese and prediabetic sand rats (Psammomys obesus).
Kam and Degen (1988) estimated that adult fat sand rats (Psammomys obesus) required 242.3 mg [kg.sup.-0.75] [day.sup.-1] of nitrogen to maintain positive nitrogen balance.
But a huge number of species in the world's arid regions, from sand rats to giraffes, can get all the moisture they need from the plants they eat.