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sample

 
1. a representative part taken to typify the whole.
2. a subset of a population that is selected for inclusion in a research study.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl),
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random (haphazard) or nonrandom, representative or nonrepresentative.
3. A piece or portion of a whole that will demonstrate the characteristics or qualities of that whole.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sample

any portion of a whole, such as a small part of a population, collected for examination.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. Specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. Selected subset of a population; may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Haemolysis was another important reason for rejection of 1360 samples, which accounts for 1.1% of total samples received during the study period.
The sample must have a known probability of selection (the sample must be representative).
The 2002 field directive was followed by revenue procedures authorizing the use of statistical samples in specified applications, including meals and entertainment deductions and the domestic production activities deduction.
Consistent with earlier statistical sampling guidance, Revenue Procedure 2011-42 provides that the propriety of the use of a statistical sample is determined by several factors including the time and cost that would be required to review the data and make a determination if sampling were not used.
SaV was detected in 7 (10%) of 69 concentrated water samples. Negative controls were included in the RT-PCR and showed negative results (data not shown).
She pulls out one of the cryovat's precious contents: a frozen sample of animal tissue that had been sent to her by a scientist that was working in Asia.
Great care should be taken to preheat the sample cup adequately, collect the sample from a clean surface without agitation, transport it to the vacuum tester with minimum loss in temperature and use an insulated pad under the sample cup.
"Where they would normally collect 500 samples in a year, they could collect 5,000," says Dagenais.
In quantitative research, sample size and sampling considerations usually are made with the goal of making statistical generalizations, which involve generalizing findings and inferences from a representative statistical sample to the population from which the sample was drawn.
The adult sample consisted of 64 females (60%) and 43 males (40%).
Kumagai and his students collect plant samples from the various Hawaiian Islands, including many remote areas.
SANS experiments with polarized neutrons [4] have measured size distributions of magnetic nanoparticles in samples. Micrometer-sized magnetic agglomerates can be characterized with a polarized SUSANS facility.