saltation


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saltation

 [sal-ta´shun]
1. the action of leaping. 2. the dancing that sometimes accompanies chorea. 3. conduction along myelinated nerves. 4. in genetics, an abrupt variation in species; a mutation. adj., adj sal´tatory.

sal·ta·tion

(sal-tā'shŭn),
A dancing or leaping, as in a disease (for example, chorea) or physiologic function (for example, saltatory conduction).
[L. saltatio, fr. salto, pp. -atus, to dance, fr. salio, to leap]

saltation

/sal·ta·tion/ (sal-ta´shun)
1. the action of leaping.
2. the jerky dancing or leaping that sometimes occurs in chorea.
4. in genetics, an abrupt variation in species; a mutation.
5. sudden increases or changes in the course of an illness.sal´tatory

saltation

(săl-tā′shən, sôl-)
n.
1. The act of leaping, jumping, or dancing.
2. Discontinuous movement, transition, or development; advancement by leaps.
3. Genetics A single mutation that drastically alters the phenotype.

saltation

[saltā′shən]
Etymology: L, saltare, to dance
a mutation causing a significant difference in appearance between parent and offspring or an abrupt variation in the characteristics of a species. saltatorial, saltatoric, saltatory [sal′tətôr′ē] , adj.

sal·ta·tion

(sal-tā'shŭn)
A dancing or leaping, as in a disease (e.g., chorea) or physiologic function (e.g., saltatory conduction).
[L. saltatio, fr. salto, pp. -atus, to dance, fr. salio, to leap]

saltation

  1. any changes of an abrupt nature that occur in the thalli of fungi either through mutation or the occurrence of segregation of parts of the thallus with different genetic make-up (HETEROKARYONS and HOMOKARYONS).
  2. the movement of soil particles by wind.
  3. the occurrence of a major mutation in a single generation, bringing about significant change.

saltation

1. the action of leaping, as in louping ill or the dancing of porcine myotonia congenita.
2. conduction along myelinated nerves.
3. in genetics, an abrupt variation in species; a mutation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kalman, Experimental Determination of Length-Dependent Saltation Velocity in Dilute Flows, Powder Technology, 134 (1), 156-166 (2003)
We did not use the site soil as the abrader due to practical problems of drying and sieving the soil to remove material that would not pass through the saltation introduction system.
As more soil becomes airborne, the effect of saltation increases down the length of a field.
This is because these equations predict erosion mainly by saltation and creep processes, and these processes are limited by the transport capacity of the site.
Mr Usher added: "It is all to do with saltation rates, the size of the grain and the amount of time the grains are wet by the rain or sea, the speed and direction of the wind.
Many are too heavy to stay aloft in the thin Martian air, but they contribute to the dust cloud through their constant hopping motion, or saltation, which kicks lighter particles upward with enough force to keep them airborne.
This process is called saltation and causes 50 percent to 75 percent of all wind erosion.
This process, in which sand grains bounce downwind, is called saltation.
After a brief bin graphical sketch (Chapter 1), she addresses Huxley's skepticism regarding gradualism, his belief in distinct morphological types, and a concurrent recognition of saltation.
1 millimeter in diameter that may be bounced off the ground by sand grains moving in saltation.
Le second n'est pas true envolee, mais un saut, une saltation de l'homme, qui exprime tout a la fois son triomphe et sa domination terrestre, qui se rive au sol, dont il est le maetre.