salt-depletion crisis

salt-·de·ple·tion cri·sis

severe illness resulting from loss of sodium chloride, usually in urine (that is, salt-losing nephritis), in sweat following severe exercise in hot weather, or in intestinal secretions, as in cholera. Can occur as result of Addison disease or addisonian crisis; characterized by hypovolemia, hypotension.

salt-de·ple·tion cri·sis

(sawlt dĕ-plēshŭn krīsis)
Severe illness resulting from loss of sodium chloride, usually in urine (i.e., salt-losing nephritis), in sweat following severe exercise in hot weather, or in intestinal secretions, as in cholera.
References in periodicals archive ?
After being rehospitalized due to a salt-depletion crisis and infection at the age of 8 months, the patient died due to sepsis.
Salt-depletion crisis developed at times despite Na supplementation.
The patient was rehospitalized twice due to salt-depletion crisis at the age of 1 and 4 years.
The patient was admitted to the emergency service at the age of 8 months with salt-depletion crisis. The serum Na level was 119 mEq/kg/day and K level was 9.1 mEq/kg/day.
All the cases in our study group were referred to our clinic with a salt-depletion crisis. The most common cause for salt-depletion in newborns is CAH (6).
Based on this, the aldosterone level should also be measured along with the 17-OHP level, which is required for CAH screening in an infant with salt-depletion crisis; hence, diagnosis delays should be prevented.