salt reduction


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salt reduction

Limiting the quantity of sodium chloride in the diet, usually to lower blood pressure or prevent fluid retention.
See also: reduction
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The time has come for the Secretary of State for Health to resuscitate the UK's salt reduction programme, helping us to, once again, be world leading rather than trailing behind the rest of the world.
Although we should strongly counsel them on salt reduction, realistically, around half of them will still exceed the safe salt limits.
The government says it will publish revised salt reduction targets next year, for the industry to achieve by mid-2023, but its first official reporting will not be until 2024, which has infuriated the health lobby.
One of the study authors, Professor Simon Capewell, from the University of Liverpool, said: "The policy messages from this dietary salt reduction analysis could not be clearer.
Key words: Salt reduction, NaCl, KCl, Lactobacillus rhamnosus FERM P-15120, angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.
The salt reduction programme in the UK, and subsequent fall in population blood pressure, has shown us how reformulation programmes can have a meaningful impact on public health."
For a while I went along half-heartedly with salt reduction advice, but when I discovered that 75% of the salt Britons eat was in processed food, I relaxed again.
* Salt reduction and other natural taste modulation solutions;
A randomised controlled trial done in Pakistan concluded that reducing sodium intake has a beneficial effect on BP in Indo-Asians with high-normal SBP.24 A meta-analysis done to see effect of long-term modest salt reduction on BP found that reducing salt intake for four or more weeks causes a significant fall in BP in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals.25
He added that targeted salt reduction in those who are most susceptible because of hypertension and high salt consumption may be preferable to a population-wide approach to reducing sodium intake in most countries except those where the average sodium intake is very high, such as parts of central Asia or China.
Graham MacGregor, professor of cardiovascular medicine at Queen Mary University of London and chairman of Cash, said that under an old scheme run by the Food Standards Agency (FSA), with involvement from Cash, the UK led the world in salt reduction.
The report presents new and innovative ways of using the umami concept for salt reduction, vegetarian/vegan products, and clean label/"natural" food items.