salt

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salt

 [sawlt]
1. any compound of a base and an acid.
3. in the plural, a saline cathartic.
bile s's glycine or taurine conjugates of bile acids, which are formed in the liver and secreted in the bile. They are powerful detergents that break down fat globules, enabling them to be digested.
buffer salt a salt in the blood that is able to absorb slight excesses of acid or alkali with little or no change in the hydrogen ion concentration.
Epsom salt magnesium sulfate.
Glauber's salt sodium sulfate.
oral rehydration s's (ORS) a dry mixture of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, dextrose, and either sodium citrate or sodium bicarbonate; dissolved in water for use in oral rehydration therapy.
smelling s's aromatic ammonium carbonate, a stimulant and restorative.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

salt

(sawlt),
1. A compound formed by the interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid are replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride, the prototypical salt. Synonym(s): table salt
3. A saline cathartic, especially magnesium sulfate, sodium sulfate, or Rochelle salt; often denoted by the plural, salts.
Synonym(s): sal
[L. sal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

salt

(sôlt)
n.
1. A colorless or white crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used as a food seasoning and preservative.
2. A chemical compound replacing all or part of the hydrogen ions of an acid with metal ions or electropositive radicals.
3. salts Any of various mineral salts, such as magnesium sulfate, sodium sulfate, or potassium sodium tartrate, used as laxatives or cathartics.
4. salts Smelling salts.
5. salts Epsom salts.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

SALT

Abbreviation for:
serum alanine aminotransferase
skin-associated lymphoid tissue
speech and language therapist 
speech and language therapy 
Swedish Aspirin Low-dose Trial
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

SALT

Oncology
1. Sequential aggressive local therapy.
2. Skin-associated lymphoid tissue. See MALT.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

salt

(sal) (sawlt)
1. A compound formed by the interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid being replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride, the prototypical salt.
3. A saline cathartic, especially magnesium sulfate, magnesium citrate, or sodium phosphate; often denoted by the plural, salts.
[L. sal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

salt

1. Any substance that dissociates in solution into ions of opposite charge.
2. Common salt, sodium chloride (NaCl).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

salt

(sawlt)
1. Compound formed by interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid are replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride.
[L. sal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about salt

Q. What steps do you take when your physician says your sodium is low

A. Drugs That May Be Prescribed By Your Doctor for Hyponatremia(low sodium):

Sodium levels must be corrected carefully. If your blood test results indicate you have a very low sodium level, your healthcare provider will cautiously correct the levels, to a "safe level."

Intravenous (IV) fluids with a high-concentration of sodium, and/or diuretics to raise your blood sodium levels.

Loop Diuretics - also known as "water pills" as they work to raise blood sodium levels, by making you urinate out extra fluid. The fluid that is lost (called "free water") is usually replaced with an IV solution that contains a high level of sodium.

A common example of this type of medication is Furosemide (e.g Lasix). You may receive this medication alone or in combination with other medications.

More discussions about salt
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References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Slocum, highway maintenance superintendent, said, "We are using the salt brine solution more extensively throughout the state.
As shown in Figure 1, the minimum freeze point of salt brine is-6[degrees]F at a concentration of 23.3 percent NaCl.
The prewetting solutions can be made from sodium chloride (NaCl, salt brine), calcium chloride (Ca[Cl.sub.2]), magnesium chloride (Mg[Cl.sub.2]), potassium acetate (KAc), or CMA.
"Our trucks are spreading salt and salt brine ahead of this storm to help prevent ice from forming, particularly on areas prone to freezing, including elevated ramps and bridges," said
We also have begun producing home-made salt brine to be used as a substitute for the CaCl or MgCl pre-wetting agents.
Materials used in the experiments include magnesium chloride (Mg[Cl.sub.2]) salt brine, calcium chloride (Ca[Cl.sub.2]) prewetted salt, calcium magnesium acetate, and liquid potassium acetate (KAc).
Also, spread salt on a roadway's elevated curves, allowing gravity to work for you as salt brine flows down and across banked curves.
So in Geneva, public works crews store salt in a covered facility on an impervious surface, use calibration to ensure their trucks aren't dispensing too much salt too fast, train drivers to understand when and how to best apply salt to de-ice roads, and pre-treat streets with liquid salt brine to help prevent icing in the first place, spokesman Kevin Stahr said.