salmonellosis


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Related to salmonellosis: salmonella, shigellosis

salmonellosis

 [sal″mo-nel-o´sis]
infection with certain species of the genus Salmonella, usually caused by the ingestion of food containing salmonellae or their products. The organisms can be found in raw meats, raw poultry, eggs, and dairy products; they multiply rapidly at temperatures between 7° and 46°C (45° and 115°F). Symptoms of salmonellosis include violent diarrhea attended by abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, and fever. It is rarely fatal and can be prevented by adequate cooking. Normal cooking temperatures destroy bacteria, even in rare roast beef. In order to avoid salmonellosis, frozen meat should be thawed in the refrigerator rather than at room temperature, leftovers should be refrigerated promptly, and raw eggs should be avoided. In the care of patients with Salmonella infections, enteric precautions are recommended for the duration of the illness.

sal·mo·nel·lo·sis

(sal'mō-nel-ō'sis),
Infection with bacteria of the genus Salmonella. Patients with sickle cell anemia or compromised immune systems are particularly susceptible.
[Salmonella + G. -osis, condition]

salmonellosis

(săl′mə-nĕ-lō′sĭs)
n. pl. salmonello·ses (-sēz′)
Infection with salmonella bacteria of serotypes other than those that cause typhoid and paratyphoid fever, characterized in humans by fever, diarrhea, and vomiting and usually caused by ingestion of contaminated food. Symptoms in animals include enteritis and septicemia, but many infected animals display no symptoms.

sal·mo·nel·lo·sis

(sal'mō-nĕl-ō'sis)
Infection with bacteria of the genus Salmonella. Patients with sickle cell anemia and those with compromised immune systems are particularly susceptible.
[Salmonella + G. -osis, condition]

salmonellosis

Infection with SALMONELLA organisms.

Salmonellosis

Food poisoning; an infection by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that usually causes severe diarrhea and may be transmitted to the fetus.

sal·mo·nel·lo·sis

(sal'mō-nĕl-ō'sis)
Infection with Salmonella bacteria. Patients with sickle cell anemia or compromised immune systems are particularly susceptible.
[Salmonella + G. -osis, condition]

Patient discussion about salmonellosis

Q. What is salmonellosis? I heard on the news that there was a salmonella outbreak recently. What is it?

A. The Salmonella germ is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals, to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria.

Q. What are the symptoms of salmonella infection?

A. Dehydration is the principal clinical concern. The incubation period – the time between ingestion of Salmonella bacteria and the onset of illness – varies from six to 72 hours.Salmonella can cause three different kinds of illness: gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, and bacteremia.Symptoms of Salmonella gastroenteritis include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and/or vomiting.In mild cases diarrhea may be non-bloody, occur several times per day, and not be very voluminous; in severe cases it may be frequent, bloody and/or mucoid, and of high volume. Fever generally occurs in the 100°F to 102°F (38°C to 39°C) range. Vomiting is less common than diarrhea. Headaches, myalgias (muscle pain), and arthralgias (joint pain) are often reported as well.Whereas the diarrhea typically lasts 24 to 72 hours, patients often report fatigue and other nonspecific symptoms lasting 7 days or longer. For the full article: http://www.about-salmonella.com/salmonella_symptoms_risks

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References in periodicals archive ?
* Veterinary surgeons and pet shop owners should give information to potential purchasers and owners about the increased risk of acquiring salmonellosis from exotic pets
Salmonellosis: Out of the total 744 cases of the diarrheic animals only two cases of stool were found positive for the Salmonella species from two different locations in the area i.e.
The selected farms were visited fortnightly for recording the observations on the presence of salmonellosis. Poultry flocks were examined physically for the typical signs/symptoms of the pullorum disease.
For infections with VTEC, the proportion of travelers to South America and Mexico was significantly higher; among salmonellosis cases, the proportion was significantly higher for travelers to the Caribbean and Mexico; and among shigellosis cases, the proportion was significantly higher among travelers to Africa, Asia (majority to South Asia), Central America and South America.
The objectives of this study were 1) to describe the distribution of salmonellosis cases in animals reported by the veterinary diagnostic laboratory at NDSU by time of submission, species of animals and county of origin and 2) to describe AMR patterns of Salmonella isolated and 3) determine associations between AMR and variables such as time of submission, species of animals and county of origin.
He pointed out that that many parents who purchase baby poultry for their children "remain unaware that the bird puts them in contact with salmonellosis and that these little critters will eventually grow to be adults and not be desirable pets."
ConAgra Foods, a Marshall, Mo., firm, is voluntarily recalling an undetermined amount of all varieties of frozen pot pie products in commerce that may be linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis, the U.S.
And some of these poisonings were attributed to the presence of Salmonella: A bacterium responsible for a type of poisoning called Salmonellosis. The numbers of people infected were a bit shocking as hundreds were affected during the same period of time, which raises lots of questions in people's minds about Salmonella and its relation to chicken and chicken products, the main commodities related to that poisoning.Salmonella is a bacterium found in foods such as raw chicken, turkey, beef, pork, other meats, eggs and unpasteurized milk products.
In new advice, EFSA said: "Pork, after eggs and poultry meat, is a major source of human foodborne salmonellosis in the European Union (EU)".
Such cheeses can cause listeriosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis, and tuberculosis, and they pose a particular risk to pregnant women, newborns, older adults, and those with weakened immune systems.
Some of the most common diseases that are spread as a result of bird droppings are Tuberculosis, Encephalitis, Meningitis, Chlamydiosis, Salmonellosis, Fowl Typhoid, Fowl Cholera, Newcastle Disease, Pullorum Disease, Spirochetosis, Streptococosis, and Q Fever.