salivate


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sal·i·vate

(sal'i-vāt),
To cause an excessive flow of saliva.

salivate

(săl′ə-vāt′)
v. sali·vated, sali·vating, sali·vates
v.intr.
1. To secrete or produce saliva.
2. Informal To be full of desire or eagerness for something: salivated at the idea of winning the lottery.
v.tr.
To produce excessive salivation in.

sal′i·va′tion (-vā′shən) n.

sal·i·vate

(sal'i-vāt)
To cause an excessive flow of saliva.

sal·i·vate

(sal'i-vāt)
To cause an excessive flow of saliva.
References in periodicals archive ?
An additional cohort of mosquitoes was allowed to salivate for intervals (repeated in triplicate) to duplicate times of observed mosquito feeding.
Consequently, whenever Esther ate the kind of mouth-watering foods that made her salivate, the nerve ends triggered the sweat glands by her ear instead - leaving a wet patch on the side of her face.
These revelations will doubtless make investors salivate, wondering whether similar opportunities are to be found in other Third World Internet stocks.
* Does creamy texture make you salivate? Emulsifiers or food thickeners help make a scoop of chocolate ice cream feel like a smooth ride rather than a rocky road.
Moreover, Robertson's remarks that any press in the room should "shoot themselves" and his claim that journalists would "salivate" to know what he was saying should be a real clue that he knew he was speaking about inappropriate activities.
It doesn't help that the attitude among those outside dance is often that dancing is not "a real job." But CTFD reminds dancers that they have transferable skills that most employers would salivate over, such as the ability to work independently and as part of a team, the ability to take direction, intelligence, discipline, persistence, motivation, flexibility, stamina, and being able to think quickly and under pressure.
Bruce Baum wants to help people salivate. As part of that unusual effort, the investigator at the National Institute of Dental Research in Bethesda, Md., has for the last few years applied the emerging tools of gene therapy to salivary glands.
The logs are virgin white and red pine, bird's-eye (sugar) maple, yellow birch, hemlock, oak, elm, and other types of wood--slow-grown, fine-grained, well-preserved logs in lengths (most are 16 feet long) and diameters to make lumbermen salivate.