salivary gland disease


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Related to salivary gland disease: sialolithiasis, salivary gland cancer, Salivary gland disorder

sal·i·var·y gland dis·ease

disorder of salivary glands; that is, Sjögren syndrome.

salivary gland disease

A highly nonspecific term for any benign, malignant, inflammatory or infectious condition affecting the salivary glands.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sialendoscopy for the management of obstructive salivary gland disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Salivary gland disease associated with HIV infection (HIV-SGD) can present as xerostomia with or without salivary gland enlargement.
At that time, several studies reported an increase in salivary gland diseases in HIV patients, despite a decreased prevalence of oral manifestations associated with HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) [11-17].
Initially, Cook Medical OHNS will focus on products that are used to treat salivary gland disease, chronic sinusitis, vocal cord paralysis and obstructive sleep apnea, as well as products used for soft-tissue repair and in interventional airway and esophageal procedures.
The study in Romani population consisted of 173 children at age range 6 to 12 years, the most common oral and perioral lesions included: candidiasis (29%), ulcers (15%), salivary gland disease (9%), necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (5%), linear gingival erythema (4%), labial molluscum contagiosum (3%), oral warts (2%), hairy leukoplakia (2%), and herpes zoster (1%).
Thirty-two international academics contribute 17 chapters to a clinical text on the medical and surgical management of salivary gland disease in patients with pediatric and adult, inflammatory or neoplastic disorders.
This syndrome has been called HIV-associated salivary gland disease when it involves the salivary glands.[1,2] Other tissues that may be infiltrated by [CD8.sup.+] lymphocytes include the lacrimal glands and extraglandular tissues, such as kidney, muscle, nerve, liver, lung, gastrointestinal tract, and breast.
Other topics in the 18 chapters include assessment and diagnosis, problems related to systemic conditions, pharmacology, the operating room and instruments, extraction and complications, prostheses, surgical infections, jaw cysts, oral cancer, salivary gland disease, temporomandibular disorders and chronic orofacial pain, and facial deformity.
Viruses and salivary gland disease: Are there associations?
(4.) Eugene Myers, Robert Erris, Salivary Gland Disorders, Chapter 3: Pathology of Salivary gland disease, 61-65.
It should be a valuable addition to the library of anyone interested in salivary gland disease.