salivary


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salivary

 [sal´ĭ-ver-e]
pertaining to the saliva.
salivary glands the glands in the mouth that secrete saliva. The major ones are the three pairs known as the parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual glands (see Plates); there are other smaller salivary glands within the cheeks and tongue. The largest are the parotids, located below and in front of each ear. Saliva secreted by these glands is discharged into the mouth through openings in the cheeks on each side opposite the upper teeth. The submaxillary glands, located inside the lower jaw, discharge saliva upward through openings into the floor of the mouth. The sublingual glands, beneath the tongue, also discharge saliva into the floor of the mouth.



The saliva is needed to moisten the mouth, lubricate food for easier swallowing, remineralize the tooth surface, and provide the enzyme (ptyalin) necessary to begin food breakdown in the preliminary stage of digestion. The salivary glands produce about 1.5 liters of saliva daily.

The salivary glands are controlled by the nervous system. Normally they respond by producing saliva within 2 or 3 seconds after being stimulated by the sight, smell, or taste of food. This quick response is a reflex action.

In mumps (parotitis), the parotids become inflamed and swollen. Occasionally, salivary glands produce too much saliva; this condition is called ptyalism, and is the result of local irritation from dental appliances or of disturbances of digestion or of the nervous system or other causes. Certain diseases, drugs such as morphine or atropine, and nutritional deficiency of vitamin B can result in decreased secretion of saliva.
The salivary glands. From Jarvis, 2000.
salivary gland inclusion disease cytomegalic inclusion disease.

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-vār'ē),
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine
[L. salivarius]

salivary

(săl′ə-vĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or producing saliva.
2. Of or relating to a salivary gland.

salivary

adjective Relating to the saliva or salivary gland.

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-var-ē)
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine.
[L. salivarius]

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-var-ē)
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine.
[L. salivarius]
References in periodicals archive ?
To study how the salivary gland might obstruct malaria transmission, the researchers first let Anopheles mosquitoes feed on rodent blood enriched with malaria parasites.
TGF-[alpha] regulates epithelial proliferation and branching morphogenesis during prenatal and post-natal growth of salivary glands (Mogi et al., 1995; Jaskoll and Melnick, 1999; Patel et al., 2006; Tucker, 2007).
Operative Procedure.--The wide distribution of subsites that are involved by salivary gland carcinomas results in a wide complexity of procedural types, and it necessitates open communication between the operating surgeon and the pathologist.
All cases of salivary gland lesions diagnosed in FNA cytology and surgical pathology sections of Department of Pathology from January 2016 to Dec.
Approximately 5% of all patients visiting dental clinics are reported to have diabetes.11 Therefore, examination of the composition of saliva in patients with diabetes may be useful to understand why oral manifestations occur and how they should be treated.5 Several salivary factors have been reported to affect the incidence of dental caries in T2DM patients.12 There is no consensus on the possible association between T2DM and salivary dysfunction in diabetes.13 The current study was planned to assess the salivary factors of DM patients as well as the impact of gender on these factors.
On this basis, aiming at investigation of the relationship between male young elite wrestlers' blood and salivary lactate densities and, heart rate, the present study makes an effort for non-invasive estimation of lactate threshold through the application of stationary wrestling-based periodic exercises while also pursuing the indirect goal of objective estimation of lactate.
They identified two transcription factors, Sox9 and Foxc1, as key to the differentiation of stem cells into salivary gland tissue.
Although MEC is the most common of all malignant salivary gland tumors, statistics show that malignancy of salivary glands is quite rare and intraoral involvement of minor salivary glands is even rarer.
In human beings, the parotid gland is the largest salivary gland followed by the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands while in rats submandibular salivary gland is the largest salivary gland followed by parotid and sublingual salivary glands.5
Our objective in this study was to demonstrate possible autonomic dysfunction with the use of salivary [alpha]-amylase measurements during and after the vertigo attacks of MD and BPPV
Among 57 cases of salivary gland tumors 34 (59.65%) were benign and 23 (40.35%) were malignant.
The salivary fluid is an exocrine secretion consisting of approximately 99% water with a variety of electrolytes including sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorides, bicarbonates, phosphates, and proteins represented by enzymes, immunoglobulins and other antimicrobial factors, mucosal glycoproteins, and traces of albumin with glucose and nitrogenous products such as urea and ammonia secreted mainly by three pairs of major salivary glands, namely parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands.