saliva


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saliva

 [sah-li´vah]
the enzyme-containing secretion of the salivary glands.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă),
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in a measure, to convert starch into maltose, the latter action being effected by a diastatic enzyme, ptyalin.
Synonym(s): spittle
[L. akin to G. sialon]

saliva

/sa·li·va/ (sah-li´vah) the enzyme-containing secretion of the salivary glands.sal´ivary

saliva

(sə-lī′və)
n.
The watery mixture of secretions from the salivary and oral mucous glands that lubricates chewed food, moistens the oral walls, and contains ptyalin.

saliva

[səlī′və]
Etymology: L, spittle
the clear, viscous fluid secreted by the salivary and mucous glands in the mouth. Saliva contains water, mucin, organic salts, and the digestive enzyme ptyalin. It serves to moisten the oral cavity, to initiate the digestion of starches, and to aid in the chewing and swallowing of food. Approximately 1 to 1.5 L is produced per day. salivary, adj.

saliva

Spit The clear, semifluid secretion of the major and minor salivary glands, and mucus-secreting cells of the oral cavity; saliva keeps the oral cavity moist, lubricates food during mastication–which facilitates deglutition, and, via its enzyme content-alpha amylase, begins the process of digestion. See Salivary glands, Sputum.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acid (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretions from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and to convert starch into maltose.
Synonym(s): spittle.
[L. akin to G. sialon]

saliva

A slightly alkaline, watery fluid secreted into the mouth by the SALIVARY GLANDS. Saliva contains the digestive enzyme amylase capable of breaking down starch to simpler sugars. Saliva keeps the mouth moist, dissolves taste particles in food so that they can stimulate the taste buds on the tongue and lubricates food during mastication to assist in swallowing.

saliva

a viscous, transparent liquid containing water, salts, MUCIN and (sometimes) salivary AMYLASE. Saliva is secreted by cells of the salivary glands which, in humans, occur in three pairs, one in the cheek and two between the bones of the lower jaw. The quantity of saliva produced depends on the type of food being consumed. Dry foods and acidic foods stimulate a copious volume of nonviscous saliva, while liquids such as milk stimulate small quantities of thick saliva.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
Clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of oral cavity; its function is to keep mucous membrane of mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in some measure, to convert starch into maltose.
[L. akin to G. sialon]

saliva

the enzyme-containing secretion of the salivary glands.

saliva tests
tests conducted on the saliva of horses competing in races or show events to detect the presence of drugs used to affect the horse's performance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of saliva is done commonly for the diagnosis of the following conditions:[13],[14],[15],[16],[17],[18],[19],[20],[21],[22],[23],[24],[25]
Surprisingly, they found the largest differences in the resting saliva of the subjects compared to saliva produced after swishing around a salty solution.
This study was designed to measure TAC, TTM and KAT in Blood and saliva of mother at the second stage of labor and cord blood of newborns delivered through these different delivery modes.
0764) The study , titled "Frogs use a viscoelastic tongue and non-Newtonian saliva to catch prey," is published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.
2) By serving in this protective capacity, saliva is actively involved in the prevention of the diseases of the mouth, dental caries and periodontal diseases.
Speaking at the world's biggest science conference in Washington DC, he said: "If there is circulating signature of a tumour in a person's blood or saliva, this test will find it.
With a jolt of electricity it stimulates glands beneath the skin and boosts the amount of saliva produced.
No other etiological factor can influence the outcome of dental caries, as much as the saliva can do.
To see what big-grazer saliva might do to fungal defenses, the researchers persuaded zoos to collect drool when animals were anesthetized for medical procedures.
A large number of diagnostic analytes have been shown to be present in saliva, including steroid hormones1 and the HIV antibody.
Saliva is an aqueous fluid found in the oral cavity, composed of a complex mixture of secretory products (both organic and inorganic) from the salivary glands and other substances coming from the oropharynx, upper airway, gastrointestinal reflux, gingival sulcus fluid, food deposits, and blood-derived compounds.