saline cathartic


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cathartic

 [kah-thahr´tik]
1. causing emptying of the bowels.
2. an agent that so acts; called also evacuant and purgative.
3. producing emotional catharsis.
bulk cathartic one stimulating bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.
lubricant cathartic one that acts by softening the feces and reducing friction between them and the intestinal wall.
saline cathartic one that increases fluidity of intestinal contents by retention of water by osmotic forces, and indirectly increases motor activity.
stimulant cathartic one that directly increases motor activity of the intestinal tract.

saline cathartic

Etymology: L, sal, salt; Gk, katharsis, cleansing
one of a large group of cathartics administered to achieve prompt, complete evacuation of the bowel. A watery semifluid evacuation usually occurs within 3 to 4 hours. The most common indication for the administration of any of these agents is preparation of the bowel for diagnostic examination. Various preparations, including magnesium sulfate, sodium phosphate, sodium sulfate, and several naturally occurring mineral waters, may be used to achieve catharsis. The palatability of, cost of, and adverse systemic reactions to the saline cathartics depend on the particular agent used and the dose of the agent given.

saline cathartic

A salt, such as epsom salt, used to produce evacuation of the bowel.
See also: cathartic

cathartic

1. causing bowel evacuation, usually of liquid feces; an agent that so acts.
2. producing catharsis.

bulk cathartic
one stimulating bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.
irritant cathartic
contact irritants that directly or indirectly cause diarrhea. May cause superpurgation in susceptible animals, especially horses. Drastic purgatives such as croton oil are no longer used. Castor oil, danthron, senna and cascara are still used, but much less than more bland agents such as mineral oil.
lubricant cathartic
one that acts by softening the feces and reducing friction between them and the intestinal wall.
osmotic cathartic
agents which retain water into the intestinal lumen, thereby producing liquid feces; includes saline cathartics (below).
saline cathartic
one that increases fluidity of intestinal contents by retention of water by osmotic forces, and indirectly increases motor activity.
stimulant cathartic
one that directly increases motor activity of the intestinal tract.

saline

salty; of the nature of a salt.

saline cathartic
see saline cathartic.
saline drench
an orally administered preparation of electrolytes in water used in racehorses but more particularly in endurance and event horses in which heavy electrolyte losses in sweat are likely. A variety of formulations is used but all contain sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium ions; some also contain glucose.
saline solution
a solution of salt (sodium chloride) in purified water. Physiological saline solution is a 0.9% solution of sodium chloride and water and is isotonic, i.e. of the same osmotic pressure as blood serum.
saline water poisoning
see sodium chloride poisoning.
saline waters
waters from surface running mineral springs, water obtained from natural underground storages in artesian and subartesian bores.