salicylate


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salicylate

 [sah-lis´ĭ-lāt]
any salt or ester of salicylic acid; those used as drugs for their analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory effects include aspirin, choline salicylate, magnesium salicylate, and sodium salicylate. Low dosages of salicylates are used primarily for the relief of mild to moderate pain or fever; high dosages are particularly useful for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatoid disorders.



The mechanism of most of the effects of aspirin and other salicylates is inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, thus blocking pyretic and inflammatory processes that are mediated by prostaglandins. Aspirin also prolongs bleeding time through its effects on platelets owing to both inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and acetylation of platelet structures. Salicylates also cause ulceration and hemorrhagic lesions of the gastric mucosa. They act by interfering with the stomach's mucosal barrier (either directly or possibly by an effect on prostaglandins when given parenterally) so that H+ ions leak and there is subsequent damage. Aspirin should not be taken with alcohol, because this increases gastrointestinal damage. Aspirin should be avoided by persons with gastric ulcers, hemophilia, or hemorrhagic states, and by children with a viral illness.

Another problem associated with the use of salicylates is hypersensitivity. This most commonly occurs with aspirin and is less common with other salicylates. Aspirin-sensitive individuals often also react to other antiinflammatory agents, such as indomethacin, and to a yellow dye used to color foods and drugs called tartrazine or FD & C Yellow No. 5. The allergic reaction usually takes the form of edema of the face and intestinal tract and asthma. Aspirin sensitivity occurs in about 0.25–1.0 per cent of the population and is more common in persons with a history of asthma or other allergic disorders. There is a common association with nasal polyps.
Salicylate Poisoning. Mild salicylate toxicity, which can occur from high dosage therapy, has symptoms that include headache, dizziness, tinnitus, deafness, nausea, vomiting, and acid-base disturbances. If the poisoning occurs in the home, a poison control center should be contacted immediately. Large overdoses produce acute poisoning that is a medical emergency. Treatment consists of gastrointestinal decontamination, administration of intravenous fluids to correct dehydration and acid-base imbalance, and hemodialysis if serum salicylate levels are very high. Body sponging with cool water is done for hyperpyrexia. Blood salicylate levels and blood gases and electrolytes are periodically determined by laboratory tests. Life-threatening poisoning may require exchange transfusion or renal dialysis.
methyl salicylate see under methyl.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sa·lic·y·late

(să-lis'i-lāt), Although this word is correctly accented on the first syllable, the pronunciation shown is nearly universal in the U.S.
1. A salt or ester of salicylic acid.
2. To treat foodstuffs with salicylic acid as a preservative. Synonym(s): salicylize
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

salicylate

Salicylic acid Pharmacology The analgesic derivative of aspirin, used topically as a keratolytic. See Salicylism.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sa·lic·y·late

(să-lis'i-lāt)
1. A salt or ester of salicylic acid.
2. To treat foodstuffs with salicylic acid as a preservative.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sa·lic·y·late

(să-lis'i-lāt)
A salt or ester of salicylic acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Salicylate and quinine selectively increase spontaneous firing rates in secondary auditory cortex.
The cause is unknown; however, salicylates have been implicated as a possible causative agent.
Methyl salicylate and especially benzyl acetate were relatively effective in attracting Eulaema species, and the large eucalyptol vs.
Patients with salicylate toxicity typically present with tinnitus, gastrointestinal complications (nausea, vomiting, bleeding, and liver toxicity), hyperthermia (via uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation), pulmonary edema, and mixed acid-base disorder (high anion gap metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis via stimulation of respiratory center in the brain stem) [55].
XRD pattern of the LHS (salicylate) revealed two series of basal reflections, which correspond to basal spacing of 12.77 [Angstrom] (main phase) and 14.8 [Angstrom] (contamination).
Sodium salicylate (Na[C.sub.7][H.sub.5][O.sub.3]) was procured from Merck and used as-received without further purification.
Excipients: methyl salicylate, menthol, triclosan, propylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol and deodorized mixture of butane and propane-values not specified in the package insert (BIOFENAC, 2006).
###1###Phenyl salicylate + Vitamin C###1.23###1.25###4.34###4.41###2.43###2.45
injection of sodium salicylate (200 mg/kg) dissolved in saline (50 mg/mL) or an equivalent volume of saline (control).
The maximum up regulation of OsPAL after methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate application was 10 and 12 times higher at 12 h, respectively as compared to control plants.
Keywords: Solid Aerosol, Bismuth salicylate, Potassium phenoxide, Sodium-GA-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate tetrahydrate and Cadmium salicylate hydrate as Major Pollutants, remote and local origin both, X-ray Diffraction, Particle size distribution, health co relationship (protective measures).