salacious

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salacious

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) adjective referring to sexual arousal, in particular with an element of or basis in indecency or lechery.

salacious

(sĕ-lā′shŭs) [L. salax, lustful]
Lustful or inciting to lust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perchard: The project is to de-romanticize the drug-taking salaciousness that constitutes the bulk of jazz biography, so the trick here will be to talk about what is actually a more grimy and gossip-worthy world than previously revealed, but without a corresponding rise in tittle-tattle.
In the current study, we examined whether the salaciousness of the alibi activities affects believability.
Nor, of course, does she tell us of Burne-Jones' devastating love affair with the sultry Anglo-Greek artist Maria Zambaco, although Georgiana allusively observes, in a turn of phrase that would have made Wilde jealous, how 'Two things had tremendous power over him--beauty and misfortune--and far would he go to serve either.' MacCarthy reveals considerably more, but implicit is her belief that quotations and facts should speak for themselves; the result is an absence of salaciousness or vulgar sensationalism.
While the theory that both salaciousness and frigidity equated to moral insanity seems paradoxical, the commonality is that, in a particular circumstance, the behaviour deviated from and defied masculine desire.
would also follow from the immoral salaciousness that would ensue, once
Thus, there's an urgency to many of the pieces included in True Confessions that is at odds with the cheeky salaciousness of the title.
Many have observed the salaciousness of the censor; the leering, suggestive ebullience that can accompany a vigorous censorship campaign.
I would add that salaciousness is also in the eye of the beholder.
Too many of us have winked in amusement at the salaciousness without considering the larger corruption of journalism and politics promulgated by Murdoch Culture on both sides 
of the Atlantic.
Before the old men can pursue their salaciousness any further, Melanie, Wooten's widow, interrupts them.
Again a blank stave is given, and the re-created nun is to sing from Psalms 128:1; the Latin translates to "often they have overcome me in my youth." An audience member trained in Latin would perhaps get the joke immediately, but for the laity in the audience, Infidelity explains the salaciousness:
Then, of course, there's the Fourth Estate, the gentleman of Her Majesty's media, for whom the combination of salaciousness and moral outrage represents the perfect readall-about-it storm.