wind

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Related to sailing close to the wind: To raise the wind

wind

anemophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

wind

pronounced WIN'd Vox populi The rushing of air from one point to another, generally induced by differences in land temperature. See Fire wind.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wind

A popular term for the result of air swallowing by greedy babies. Air swallowed along with a feed becomes compressed by PERISTALSIS and may cause COLIC and much crying. Slower feeding, dill water and silicone polymer oils, to reduce surface tension and form froth, are helpful.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about wind

Q. second wind My cousin is an experienced aerobic for nearly 2 years. She does vigorous exercises. How a ''second wind'' affects her and what is it?

A. The term ‘second wind is mostly known to the people who are related to the fitness. No matter how fit you are, the first few minutes into vigorous exercise you'll feel out of breath, and your muscles may ache. Your body isn't able to transport oxygen to the active muscles quickly enough. As a result, your muscles burn carbohydrates an aerobically, causing an increase in lactic acid production. Gradually, your body makes the transition to aerobic metabolism and begins to burn nutrients (carbohydrates and fats) aerobically. This shift over to aerobic metabolism coincides with your getting ''back in stride'' (a.k.a. the ''second wind''). The more you train and the more fit you become, the sooner you will get your ''breath'' back and reach an aerobic steady state that you can maintain for a relatively extended duration.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Winning seven of their 22 games and sailing close to the wind in a season where coaches and players changed in their droves, McKenzie said: "Unfortunately things never went our way in terms of performances, and stability in coaching.
The ex-Scotland winger is convinced the devastating loss of TV revenue will be too much for a club already sailing close to the wind.
They take a delight in sailing close to the wind. Several adverts have been banned and can only be seen on YouTube and umpteen complaints were made about the blind footballers, the ad that has you wincing as you laugh.
Sailing close to the wind at times, his gags often flew out of left wing and nobody was safe as he confessed to cat-killing - and even managed to get away with a few digs about thieving Scousers.
The Glaciere project aims to keep disadvantaged children sailing close to the wind on the straight and narrow.
What we are all hoping is that the spate of suspensions will have changed the culture among some jockeys that sailing close to the wind is an acceptable part of the job, and that making a couple of quid on the sly is fine and dandy.
Blues have been sailing close to the wind with the strikers they've got and this could rebound on them.
Megson added: "Blackburn had a lot of possession and when you concede that much you are sailing close to the wind.
``At the same time I cannot discriminate against him - he is not breaking the law even if he is sailing close to the wind. His business doesn't seem an ideal sort of thing to have in the town but it is true that people come from all over the place to go there.''