wind

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Related to sail close to the wind: off the wind

wind

anemophobia.

wind

pronounced WIN'd Vox populi The rushing of air from one point to another, generally induced by differences in land temperature. See Fire wind.

wind

A popular term for the result of air swallowing by greedy babies. Air swallowed along with a feed becomes compressed by PERISTALSIS and may cause COLIC and much crying. Slower feeding, dill water and silicone polymer oils, to reduce surface tension and form froth, are helpful.

Patient discussion about wind

Q. second wind My cousin is an experienced aerobic for nearly 2 years. She does vigorous exercises. How a ''second wind'' affects her and what is it?

A. The term ‘second wind is mostly known to the people who are related to the fitness. No matter how fit you are, the first few minutes into vigorous exercise you'll feel out of breath, and your muscles may ache. Your body isn't able to transport oxygen to the active muscles quickly enough. As a result, your muscles burn carbohydrates an aerobically, causing an increase in lactic acid production. Gradually, your body makes the transition to aerobic metabolism and begins to burn nutrients (carbohydrates and fats) aerobically. This shift over to aerobic metabolism coincides with your getting ''back in stride'' (a.k.a. the ''second wind''). The more you train and the more fit you become, the sooner you will get your ''breath'' back and reach an aerobic steady state that you can maintain for a relatively extended duration.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Our correspondent investigates if there has been any progress on this as yet of if the banks are continuing to sail close to the wind.
It encourages jockeys to sail close to the wind, and the fact that Ahern got a two-day ban for careless riding tells you he did, if not right into it.
If, for purposes of illustration, we entertain the English idiom 'to sail close to the wind', the AND explanation of estreit beiter as 'to act carefully' seems quite close to the mark but lacks the reference point of the idiom, the prevailing wind in the concrete application, ethical standards in the social context.
Kevin and Molly sail close to the wind when they get cosy in his bed and Sally comes home.