sago

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sago

(sā′gō) [Malay sagu]
A substance prepared from various palms, consisting principally of starches; used as a demulcent and as a food with little residue.
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Sago palm trees were being cut down in many areas,' Ocite recalled as he acknowledged the DOST for the help that became the firm's Sago Flour Mill.
Therefore it is necessary for conservation efforts in order to remain sustainable sago palm Conservation and expansion of sago palm directed to area that a relatively dry region in upland or in the higher altitude.
They collected fruits, gained starch from the sago palm, and hunted barking deer and wild boar.
This volume compiles past studies on the sago palm (many that were undertaken by the members of the Japan Society of Sago Palm Studies) and its origin, dispersal, distribution, ecology, morphology, growth characteristics, physiology, cultivation and management, uses, anthropology, and starch productivity, extraction, production, properties, and uses.
Sago palm is commonly found in tropical lowland forests and freshwater swamps.
Elucidating genetic signatures of native and introduced populations of the Cycad Blue, Chilades pandava, to Taiwan: a threat both to Sago Palm and to native Cycas populations worldwide.
One of these is sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) which is abundantly available and is widespread in southeast Asia and Oceania (FAO, 1983).
In Malaysia, the sago palm (Metroxylon sago), which grows in freshwater swamps, is an important source of starch, and is presently being used for the production of glucose.
In addition, a number of New Guinea populations use stone tools to chop down sago palms. A cigar or bullet shaped sago palm feller, made from hammer-dressed igneous rock, and with no alternative uses (Figure 19), has a distribution coterminous with sago production areas (Crosby 1976, Rhoads 1977:32).
Sago palm's versatility to grow in hostile conditions and its ability to act as a natural carbon dioxide sink, in the light of environmental damage control, as stressed by Stanton (1993) and recent studies bordering on the morphological variability and genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia (e.g.
Coastal and near-coastal peoples who derive their livelihood from the sea and depend on flour from the sago palm for thestarch in their diet while the highlanders' economy is dominated by pigs and sweet potatoes.