sago


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sago

(sā′gō) [Malay sagu]
A substance prepared from various palms, consisting principally of starches; used as a demulcent and as a food with little residue.
References in periodicals archive ?
A systems thinking approach to knowledge acquisition and sharing with respect to indigenous knowledge, let alone western scientific knowledge on sago palm management and processing, so as to learn, adapt and act accordingly with new improved situations, offered by science that is based upon high technology solutions, is also part and parcel of the SMP in sago using agrarian societies.
A toy line for both Toca Boca and Sago Mini is also an emerging focus.
Data in Table 1 indicate that the rainfall rates are suitable for the growth and production of sago palm.
ii) Sample prepared according to the weight fraction: sample D = 90 wt% Sago fibre + 10 wt% UF, sample E = 80 wt% Sago fibre + 20 wt% UF, and sample F = 70 wt% Sago fibre + 30 wt% UF.
The authors conclude that chemically modified sago waste may be suitable for applications where engine oil needs to be removed from an aqueous environment.
8220;As we hoped, the great design and price point Sago offers are being well received,” says Debby King, director of marketing for Brookfield Homes.
The search string "Sago" in the "Basic search" field of SCI was used during 1973-2010 to download the records on the subjects of Sago.
MacPherson, in her role as demonic force--in a letter, O'Nolan calls her "a fearful virago" (29 Oct 1964) (1)--is designed as a stereotype of aggressive American feminists of the 1960s, but the violence she brings appears as a commercializing venture, an economic scheme: her plan is to import sago to Ireland and replace the potato crop.
2 tablespoons sago 1 pint milk A pinch of salt 2 eggs 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1/4 cup sugar
With this in mind, researchers in India investigated the water vapor permeation properties of sago starch-based edible films, made using microwave irradiation.
In a book featuring period images from the Minnilusa Historical Association, Cerney (who lives on a ranch near the Badlands) and Sago (Western historical studies/university archives, Black Hills State U.
We see dozens of stories making essentially the same points about an Obama press conference, yet no one visits the mines six months after the Sago disaster to see if reforms have been instituted that could prevent another disaster at Upper Big Branch.