scaphocephaly

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scaphocephaly

 [skaf″o-sef´ah-le]
abnormal length and narrowness of the skull as a result of premature closure of the sagittal suture. adj., adj scaphocephal´ic, scaphoceph´alous.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

scaph·o·ceph·a·ly

(skaf'ō-sef'ă-lē),
A form of craniosynostosis that results in a long, narrow head in which the parietal eminences are absent and frontal and occiptal protrusions are conspicuous; there may be a crest indicating the site of a prenatally closed sagittal suture; sometimes accompanied by mental retardation.
[scapho- + G. kephalē, head]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A defect in infant skull shape caused by premature closure of the sagittal, parietotemporal, sphenotemporal, and sphenoparietal sutures, resulting in an anteroposterior elongation of the skull
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

scaphocephaly

Boat-shaped skull Pediatrics A defect in infant skull shape caused by premature closure of the sagittal, parietotemporal, sphenotemporal, and sphenoparietal sutures, resulting in an anteroposterior elongation of the skull. See Craniostenosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scaph·o·ceph·a·ly

(skaf'ŏ-sef'ă-lē)
A form of craniosynostosis that results in a long narrow head.
Synonym(s): cymbocephaly, sagittal synostosis, scaphocephalism, tectocephaly.
[scapho- + G. kephalē, head]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 107 patients had sagittal synostosis, demonstrating the characteristic scaphocephalic shape and various aspects of frontal bossing, occipital cupping, bitemporal narrowing, and palpable midline sagittal ridge.
Total calvarial reconstruction for sagittal synostosis in older infants and children.