sagittal sinus


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sagittal sinus

The superior or the inferior sagittal sinus.
See also: sinus
References in periodicals archive ?
The transverse and the sigmoid sinuses were compared with size of superior sagittal sinus. If size of the transverse and sigmoid sinus was found to be half of the linear measurement of superior sagittal sinus, it was considered hypoplastic.
Superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus were the commonly affected venous channels.
Digital subtraction angiography revealed occlusion of superior sagittal sinus, right transverse sinus, and sigmoid sinus.
Is the Elevation of Depressed Calveria over Superior Sagittal Sinus (SSS)-(No Men Land) Rightly Contraindicated?
If the thrombus lies in the superior sagittal sinus, one might see the "filled delta sign" (Figure 4(c)) on noncontrasted CT, which appears as a hyperdense triangle at the superior sagittal sinus on axial view [6].
The venous structure was further drained into the superior sagittal sinus of the brain.
Tomsick, "Large arachnoid granulations involving the dorsal superior sagittal sinus: findings on MR imaging and MR venography," American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol.
Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis associated with Evans' syndrome of haemolyticanaemia.
Although SRNS patients are at a higher risk of developing thromboembolic complications, sagittal sinus and intracardiac thrombosis are rarely observed.
Although there was no difference in the localization of occluded sinus between CVT patients with or without BD in our study, we found that transverse sinus was the most common and sagittal sinus was the second most common affected sinus in CVT patients with BD contrary with previous reports.
This patient was a two-year old patient who had intracranial hemorrhage due to head trauma and was found to have hydrocephaly and thrombosis in the sagittal sinus. Severe spasticity was present on neurological examination and the patient was receiving antiepileptic treatment because of resistant seizures.
They address the common presentations, subtypes, biomechanics, and outcomes of abusive head trauma, then common presentations, treatment, diagnostic significance, and related conditions of specific medical mimics: birth trauma, congenital malformations, benign extra axial fluid of infancy, genetic and metabolic disorders, hematological diseases and disorders of coagulation and clotting, autoimmune and vasculitic conditions, medical and surgical complications with intracranial hemorrhages, infectious diseases, oncologic mimics, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, toxins, poisons, nutritional deficiencies, short falls, motor vehicle collisions, and mimics of abusive fractures.