sacrospinalis

sacrospinalis

(sā″krō-spī-nāl′ĭs) [″ + spina, thorn]
A large muscle group lying on either side of the vertebral column extending from the sacrum to the head. Its two chief components are the iliocostalis and longissimus muscles.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an inverted triangle the base of which is formed by the 12th rib and the lower edge of serratus posterior inferior muscle, anteriorly bounded by the posterior border of internal oblique muscle, posteriorly bounded by the anterior border of sacrospinalis muscle.
Separation of fibers of posterior layer of lumbodorsal fascia with herniation of the sacrospinalis muscle as a cause," The American Journal of Surgery, vol.
The boundaries of the superior triangle are the posterior border of the internal oblique muscle anteriorly, the anterior border of the sacrospinalis posteriorly, the twelfth rib, and the serratus posterior inferior muscle superiorly.
B, initial description by Wiltse of the paraspinal sacrospinalissplitting approach to the lumbar spine showing the plane between the longissimus part and the multifidus part of the sacrospinalis muscle.
The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators before operation and 3, 12 months postoperation were compared.
In Figure 9(e) and Figure 9(f), main tissues are psoas major, descending aorta, vertebral body and the right side of sacrospinalis. Figure 9(h) shows the segmented region with the boundary highlighted.
After the removal of the balloon, 2 working ports, 11 mm and 5 mm in size, were inserted under finger guidance, one in the renal angle just below the 12th rib at the lateral border of the sacrospinalis muscle, and the other was inserted 11 mm above and anterior to the anterior superior iliac spine.
This has also been my experience with the needle, and it stands to reason--no stimulus would be expected with injection into the CSF or epidural vein, or other "soft spot" like the sacrospinalis muscle.
Subcutaneous lumbar nodules are different from myofascial trigger points, although their locations may be similar.[5] The nodules are said to consist of adipose tissue separated by fibrous septa, surrounded by a firm fibrous capsule.[2,3] They are distributed inferiorly along the iliac crests, over and around the sacroiliac joints, and at the edges of the sacrospinalis muscle (Figure 3).
They concluded that MI TLIF patients have less sacrospinalis muscle injury, resulting in early functional recovery and superior short-term treatment effects.
Some scholars thought the scar tissue around dura mater of the spinal cord was originated from the posterior injured sacrospinalis and the anterior injured anulus fibrosus as well as the posterior longitudinal ligament.