sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Bong Sullano, in a lengthy Facebook comment said the public has long been sacrificing for lack of energy, inefficient transportation system, lack of infrastructures, unemployment, and corruption in government among others.
The move from "sacrificing to" to "sacrificing for" was originally rooted in religious martyrdom.
Most of us think of the spiritual sacrifice as giving something up, but we have to look inside ourselves to see why we are sacrificing something in the first place.
Sacrificing as a Conflict Resolution Tactic and Relationship Maintenance Mechanism
They beautify themselves, and corrupt His house to commit sins of wantonness and idolatry, even unto sacrificing their own children: ...
Today, thousands of sacrifices will be made across the Muslim world to celebrate Eid.Jews and Christians also believe that God spared Abraham from sacrificing his son, Isaac.
And with so many Americans serving and sacrificing in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere, we believe such a reminder is, unfortunately, very necessary.
People of faith have often thought in terms of sacrificing one's life for God's purposes.
The brutal sacrifice of another (animal or human) during the secret ritual of a mystery cult become the moral self-sacrifice of a person's own desires, but even more than that, the responsibility of sacrificing oneself for another, the ultimate gift of death.
(5) Therefore, until we know how strong his faith was about God's righteousness in this matter of sacrificing Isaac, that is, until the very last second before Abraham would have to slaughter or save his son, Isaac, we can't say for sure, and -- as we have already shown -- we certainly can't set the story up so that Abraham appears more righteous than God.
Another example would be the case of a soldier who shields his fellow officers from a live hand grenade by sacrificing his own body to the explosion (108).
The burdens of such inevitably fall on the young and, for those of us who were born at the tail end of the baby boom or later, it is hard not to suspect that the next "national crisis" will inevitably involve sacrificing ever-greater portions of our wages to fund a Social Security system that will be depleted long before we retire.