saccule


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saccule

 [sak´ūl]
1. a little bag, sac, or pouch.
2. the smaller of the two divisions of the membranous labyrinth, which communicates with the cochlear duct by way of the ductus reuniens.
laryngeal saccule sacculus laryngis.

sac·cule

(sak'yūl),
1. The smaller of the two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the labyrinth, lying in the spheric recess; it is connected with the cochlear duct by a very short tube, the ductus reuniens, and with the utriculus by the beginning of the endolymphatic sac and the utriculosaccularis duct that joins it.
2. The immense bag-shaped structure formed by peptidoglycans as part of the cell wall of certain microorganisms.
[L. sacculus]

saccule

(săk′yo͞ol) also

sacculus

(-yə-ləs)
n. pl. saccules also sacculi (săk′yə-lī′)
1. A small sac.
2. The smaller of two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the inner ear.

sac·cule

(sak'yūl)
1. The smaller of the two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the labyrinth, lying in the spheric recess; connected with the cochlear duct by a very short tube, the ductus reuniens, and with the utriculus by the beginning of the ductus endolymphaticus and the ductus utriculosaccularis that joins it.
2. The immense, bag-shaped structure formed by peptidoglycans as part of the cell wall of certain microorganisms.
Synonym(s): sacculus [TA] .
[L. sacculus]

saccule

  1. any small sac.
  2. a membranous labyrinth joined to the UTRICLE and forming part of the vestibular apparatus in the inner ear.

sac·cule

(sak'yūl)
1. [TA] Smaller of two membranous sacs in vestibule of labyrinth, lying in spheric recess; connected with cochlear duct by a short tube, the ductus reuniens, and with utriculus by beginning of endolymphatic sac and the utriculosaccularis duct that joins it.
2. Immense bag-shaped structure formed by peptidoglycans as part of the cell wall of some microorganisms.
[L. sacculus]
References in periodicals archive ?
They may occur in individuals with a congenitally large saccule or with congenital weakness of laryngeal tissues.
[19] T Bast, "Function of the utriculo-endolymphatic valvetwo cases of ruptured saccules in children," Archives of Otolaryngology, vol.
One pair of muscle sigilla (not sacculi) present posterior to each saccule Sa.
This revealed that the utricle and saccule, also known as the otoliths, directly affected brain blood flow regulation, independent of other factors, such as blood pressure.
The perilymph in the cavity was replaced with fluorocarbon (FC-75, 3-M Corp.) to isolate the endolymph-filled utricle and saccule. A tungsten wire attached to an electrosurgical generator (Valleylab, SSE4, Boulder, CO) was lowered through the fluorocarbon to contact the utricular or saccular membrane.
This ability uses information from the sensory receptors located in our muscles and tendons (spindles and GTOs), joint capsules and ligaments, connective tissues, skin (especially soles of the feet), and ear balance organs (saccule and utricle), all of which inform our central nervous system of what is going on in the periphery.
The otolith organs include the utricle and saccule, which are sensors for linear acceleration with respect to gravity.
Two other organs that are part of the vestibular system are the utricle and saccule. These are called the otolithic organs and are responsible for detecting linear acceleration, or movement in a straight line.
The peripheral vestibular system consists of two labyrinths, each of which contains three semi-circular canals (the horizontal, anterior and posterior canals), a utricle and a saccule. While receptor hair cells in the ampullae of the semi-circular canals respond to rotatory or angular acceleration of the head, the utricle and saccule (collectively referred to as the `otoliths') respond to linear acceleration (including linear acceleration by gravity).
Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) help evaluate the function of the utricule and saccule as well as the superior and inferior vestibular nerves.
To justify the involvement of vestibular nuclei and their possible effects on saccule, causing BPPV in patients with CD requires further analysis on wide patient series, including VEMP measurements.
And we found that two separate Sox2 expression domains were present at this time, a dorsal domain that corresponds to the sensory primordia of the utricle and a more ventral domain that corresponds to the sensory primordia of the saccule and the prosensory domain of the cochlea.