saccharolytic


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saccharolytic

 [sak″ah-ro-lit´ik]
capable of splitting up sugar.

sac·cha·ro·lyt·ic

(sak'ă-rō-lit'ik),
Capable of hydrolyzing or otherwise breaking down a sugar molecule.
[saccharo- + G. lysis, loosening]

saccharolytic

/sac·cha·ro·lyt·ic/ (sak″ah-ro-lit´ik) capable of breaking the glycosidic bonds in saccharides.

sac·cha·ro·lyt·ic

(sak'ăr-ō-lit'ik)
Capable of hydrolyzing or otherwise breaking down a sugar molecule.
[saccharo- + G. lysis, loosening]

saccharolytic

capable of splitting up sugar.
References in periodicals archive ?
The saccharolytic enzyme activity in the supernatants was determined by hydrolyzing 4 mg of starch at 55 C for 10 minutes.
7) It is now well accepted that it is important for good gut health to maintain saccharolytic fermentation rather than putrefactive fermentation in the colon.
28) Prevotella melaninogenica, as a saccharolytic bacteria, disintegrates galactose.
Isolates are typically saccharolytic and ferment a variety of carbohydrate compounds but fail to hydrolyze gelatin or urea, reduce nitrate, or produce indole, lecithinase, or lipase (3).
Probiotics are saccharolytic, meaning they use carbohydrates (fiber) for energy.
Cellulolytic bacteria and saccharolytic bacteria are more active under such a feeding regime, resulting in high acetic acid production.
The fermentation of lactitol favours the growth of saccharolytic bacteria and decreases the amount of proteolytic bacteria such as Gram-negative Bacterioides, Enterobacteria, Enterococci and various Coliform species, by inhibiting the adhesion of these bacteria to the epithelial cell walls and creating a low pH.
The two main types of fermentation that are carried out in the gut are saccharolytic and proteolytic.
Effect of monensin and lasalocid-sodium on the growth of methanogenic and rumen saccharolytic bacteria.
Also if continued saccharolytic fermentation occurs due to the presence of fermentable carbohydrates sources, this can reduce the occurrence of proteolytic fermentation in the large intestine, as indicated by a reduction in branched-chain fatty acids and lower concentrations of NH3 (Williams et al.