saccate


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saccate

 [sak´āt]
2. contained in a bag or sac.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sac·cate

(sak'āt),
Relating to a sac.
[L. saccus, sac]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

saccate

(săk′āt′)
adj.
Shaped like a pouch or sac: saccate pollen grains.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sac·cate

(sak'āt)
Relating to a sac.
[L. saccus, sac]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

saccate

bag-like, pouched.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
fluviatile, which has filamentous, clavate and fusoid-ventricose cheilocystidia however in that variety the clavate cystidia are elongate, while in case of Hebeloma mesophaeum these are saccate and subutriform.
Geastrum lageniforme is mainly characterized by a mycelial layer with distinct longitudinal cracks, rays with slender tips (arachnoid-like rays), saccate basidiomata and distinctly delimited fibrillose peristome.
This species is recognized by its lignicolous habit, presence of prominent yellowish white subiculum, caespitose growth, small saccate basidiomata (up to 20 mm wide), and its fibrillose, distinct, and delimited peristome.
Volva present at the base of stipe, 14-21 X13 mm, saccate, white (4A1), covered with sand, basal rhizomorphs present.
Volva present at the base of the stipe, 24-31 X 21-25 mm, saccate, yellowish white (4A2), smooth, with basal rhizomorphs.
From this and the evidence of its existence in early groups one can conclude that presence of a pollination drop is ancestral in conifers, but lost from Araucariaceae and those members of Clade I and II that lack saccate pollen.
Even then, however, this species can be readily identified by its distinctive inflorescences, which although greatly (or entirely) divested of perigynia continue to display whitish or pale brown saccate appendages, structures which are the persistent portions of otherwise deciduous scales (Wheeler & Goetghebeur, 1997).
Base of petals not or only slightly saccate (0); base of petals conspicuously saccate (1) 47.
Sepals oblong, not saccate at base, 1.5-2.5(-3) mm long; petals narrowly spatulate, 2.5-4.5(-5) mm long, obscurely papillate at base; anthers ovate, (0.4-)0.5-0.8 mm long.
Both species have "similar large scarlet flowers, pubescence, and peculiar saccate appendages below which is a conspicuous clear area [extending down the claw]." However, S.