saccadic eye movement


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.

saccadic eye movement

[sakad′ik]
an extremely fast voluntary movement of the eyes, allowing them to accurately refix on an object in the visual field.

saccadic eye movement

Neurology Rapid symmetrical jerking eye movements with constantly changing retinal foci from one point to another
References in periodicals archive ?
Combined the evidence strongly suggests that visual attention and saccadic eye movement are indeed obligatorily coupled (Schneider & Deubel, 1995).
Saccadic eye movements and the perception of visual direction.
However, among all of the oculomotor functions evaluated with both conventional testing and COVS, we found that near lateral phoria, near vertical phoria, near PFV break and recovery, and pursuit and saccadic eye movements were significantly more defective in the mTBI group than the non-mTBI group.
More specifically, in one study, participants tracked a dot target that jumped between two positions on opposite sides of a display, requiring them to follow the target with saccadic eye movements (Malmstrom, Reed, & Weber, 1983).
We find that global motion images during simulated fixational and saccadic eye movements are processed in a coordinated manner by local clusters of specific GCs in the goldfish retina.
Eight weeks from visual training exercises could affected on dynamic balance, saccadic eye movements and performance level of vault for junior gymnasts.
2] on mTBI-related symptoms, we hypothesized that there would be significant differences in postcompression SPEM and saccadic eye movements between the sham and intervention groups.
Laboratory research found that these flicker conditions could disrupt saccadic eye movements (2) , reduce visual performance (3) and reduce clerical work performance (4) , always in comparison to fluorescent lamps operated on high-frequency electronic ballasts.
We measured both fixational and saccadic eye movements on these regions during the act of speaking.
Additionally, dreaming generally occurs during REM sleep, as well as physiological events including saccadic eye movements and rapid fluctuations of respiration, heart rate and body temperature.
An unusual aspect of the technique is that it also involves having the patient engage in therapist directed, saccadic eye movements during the treatment procedure (Boudewyns and Hyer, 1996; Shapiro, 2001).