saccade


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Related to saccade: nystagmus, antisaccade

saccade

 [sah-kād´]
the series of involuntary, abrupt, rapid, small movements or jerks of both eyes simultaneously in changing the point of fixation. adj., adj saccad´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sac·cade

(să-kād'),
Rapid eye movement to redirect the line of sight.
[Fr. saccade, sudden check of a horse]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

saccade

(să-käd′, sə-)
n.
A rapid intermittent eye movement, as that which occurs when the eyes fix on one point after another in the visual field.

sac·cad′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sac·cade

(să-kahd')
A rapid movement of both eyes from one target to another; a sequence of such movements allows precise scanning of the field and is necessary for smooth reading.
See also: saccadic movement
[Fr. saccade, sudden check of a horse]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Scalp-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) are used to study cortical preparatory processes that precede the saccade onset with a high temporal resolution.
While reading, looking at a scene, or searching for an object we continually make eye movements, called "saccades." Between saccades the eyes remain relatively still, with fixations of about 200-300 milliseconds.
Table 3 reports both the mean fixation duration and the launch site as a function of whether the next saccade either lands on the pronoun or skips it.
Our findings showed a difference between those high in NC and low in NC in the eye fixation duration, fixation counts, reading speed, and saccade lengths.
From the saccade pattern, it was found that the student reviewers gave evaluation with lower scores when they gazed at the text at the bottom and looked around the space area, as shown in Table 8.
Of the studies conducted in the broad discipline of education and published in journals specific to the SSCI, we found 56 studies that measured the fixation variable and 12 that measured the saccade variable.
Other variables were the average number of fixations on trial, the average time per fixation (in microseconds), and the percentage of regressive saccades.
The participants were asked to saccade to the image that contained the animal while their success to fixate to the animal and to the correct image was measured.
Vergence velocity (positive for convergence movements and negative for divergence movements) was used to identify convergence, via a threshold-based algorithm similar to the one we have previously described for saccade recognition with Saclab toolbox [18].
The velocity traces of both the head and eye contain small ripples, which possibly influence on the gain calculation and saccade detection.
"If these deficits do turn out to be a consistent finding in a sub-group of children with ASD, this raises the possibility that saccade adaptation measures may have utility as a method that will allow early detection of this disorder."