rural

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rural

(roor′ăl) [L. ruralis, rustic, country]
Pert. to a geographic area (such as a small town or sparsely populated county) where less than 2500 people live.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Jean-Pierre Ruiz correctly criticizes Galilean Journey for espousing a kind of ruralist romanticization in its portrayal of first-century Galilee.
Neither the Southern Ruralist nor Tennessee home demonstration workers commented on the irony of a single woman, who held a clerical job and marketed her farm products, winning a contest to create a home that housed herself and her father rather than her husband and children.
Quitting her relationship with the Missouri Ruralist, she apparently intended to devote more time to writing for larger, better-paying publications, but before 1930 she experienced little success.
The Independent Ruralist (cluster 2, 24% of sample) values well-priced, independent travel in a peaceful atmosphere with lodging being of utmost concern.
Wilder spent 12 years editing the Missouri Ruralist before she began to write fiction.
Hines (co-editor of "Laura Ingalls Wilder's Fairy Poems") has expertly compiled and deftly edited a series of essays by Wilder that she wrote for publication in the 'Missouri Realist' between 1911 and 1924 in this newly revised edition of "Laura Ingalls Wilder: Farm Journalist", which now includes an additional forty-two 'Missouri Ruralist' articles and the restoration of previously omitted passages from some of her other articles previously published in the original edition.
Finally, Valerie Nollan's essay, 'Russia as a Chronotope in Works by Ruralist Writers: Toward a Philosophy of the Art', the weakest of the four in my view, articulates (too briefly in terms of actual reference to the texts) motifs in the work of Astafiev, Rasputin, and Soloukhin as chronotopes of Russia.
Their collection, from which this exhibition was drawn, excludes Bacon (perhaps because his best period was nearly over by 1960, when their collection begins) and includes artists ranging from the fascinating Pop artist turned "Ruralist" Peter Blake to an able academic like John Wonnacott, a former student of both Andrews and Auerbach, to neo-figurative wunderkind Peter Doig.
With his rigorous craft training coupled to a sophisticated understanding of Modern (and now post-Modern) thought and feeling, he is far from being the dreamy ruralist some have depicted.
His cynicism leads him to wonder whether the rush to postmodernism on the part of the Slovaks in particular, but others too, and their urge to associate themselves with Kafka, Beckett, and the French new novel, amount to, above all, an attempt to overcome the traditional parochialism (compounded by a special brand of political obscurantism in the Communist era) of any 'small' culture; can the Slovaks' postmodernist impulse really be attributed merely to 'a certain sense of what Beasley-Murray calls an "Urbanist" tradition to counter the "Ruralist" "aesthetic of identity"' (p.
Another Coventry journalist, who styles himself, The Ruralist, points out that the fox is always given a good start and usually gets away.
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