rupture

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rupture

 [rup´chur]
1. tearing or disruption of tissue.
2. to forcibly disrupt tissue.
3. hernia.

rup·ture

(rŭp'chŭr),
1. Synonym(s): hernia
2. A solution of continuity or a tear; a break of any organ or another of the soft parts.
3. When used in reference to hollow organs or trauma, term describes the acute explosive disruption of the inner portion of the organ by pressure from within or without, often allowing extravasation of its contents exteriorly.
[L. ruptura, a fracture (of limb or vein), fr. rumpo, pp. ruptus, to break]

rupture

/rup·ture/ (rup´chur)
1. tearing or disruption of tissue.
2. to forcibly disrupt tissue.
3. hernia.

rupture

(rŭp′chər)
n.
1. The process of breaking open or bursting.
2. A hernia, especially of the groin or intestines.
3. A tear in an organ or a tissue.
v.
To break open; burst.

rupture

[rup′chər]
Etymology: L, rumpere, to break
1 n, a tear or break in the continuity or configuration of an organ or body tissue, including instances when other tissue protrudes through the opening. See also hernia.
2 v, to cause a break or tear.

rupture

Medtalk A tearing or disruption of a membrane or flattened tissue that was subjected to pressure. See FASIAR rupture, Partial rupture, Premature rupture of membranes, Traumatic disk rupture.

rup·ture

(rŭp'shŭr)
1. Synonym(s): hernia.
2. A solution of continuity or a tear; a break of any organ or other of the soft parts.
[L. ruptura, a fracture (of limb or vein), fr. rumpo, pp. ruptus, to break]

rupture

A popular term for an abdominal HERNIA.

Rupture

A breaking apart of an organ or tissue.
Mentioned in: Ectopic Pregnancy

rupture

tear/break of soft tissues

rup·ture

(rŭp'shŭr)
1. Synonym(s): hernia.
2. A solution of continuity or a tear; a break of any organ or other of the soft parts.
[L. ruptura, a fracture (of limb or vein), fr. rumpo, pp. ruptus, to break]

rupture,

n a tear or break in the continuity or configuration of an organ or body tissue, including those instances when other tissue protrudes through the opening.

rupture

1. tearing or disruption of tissue.
2. hernia.
For details of individual diseases see under each organ, e.g. abomasal, aortic, atrial, cecal, intestinal, rectal, gastric, ventricular, vesical, esophageal, ligamentous, individual ligaments (e.g. cruciate, round, Achilles) urethral, hepatic, splenic, egg yolk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Examination was performed and a provisional diagnosis of a ruptured quadriceps was made but the extent of the rupture was not yet established.
The lower back pain without neurological deficit should be considered a potential silent symptom of chronic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and use of computed tomography angiography in this situation is justified.
The results showed that spontaneously ruptured tendons display regions with decreased collagen fibre thickness, decreased crimp angle, and disrupted crimp continuity, microscopic alterations that possibly result in reduced strength of tendons being less resistant to tensile forces and thus place them at increased risk of ruptures [11].
34) In this setting the addition of MRI would find few additional implant ruptures not detected by sonography.
It varies from a catastrophic event, with an acute tear in the infracted myocardium leading to immediate death--acute rupture, or slow and incomplete tear leading to a late rupture, subacute rupture.
Spontaneous rupture of ante-partum uterus is uncommon in 1st and 2nd trimester.
One hundred and ten patients with intrapleural/intrabronchial HC rupture were evaluated retrospectively.
3,7-10) However, there are few reports about rupture of the anterior lens capsule due to blunt ocular trauma in the literature.
Key Words: Uterine Rupture, Previous caesarean section, Obstructed labour.
Dynamised cast management of Achilles tendon ruptures.
Uterine ruptures mostly occur due to previous cesarean sections.
In this study, all participants were scanned by ultrasound, which provides conclusive indication of rupture, rather than clinical examination which is typically used.