ruminate

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ruminate

(ro͞o′mə-nāt′)
v. rumi·nated, rumi·nating, rumi·nates
v.intr.
1. To turn a matter over and over in the mind.
2. To chew cud.
v.tr.
To reflect on over and over again.

ru′mi·na′tive adj.
ru′mi·na′tive·ly adv.
ru′mi·na′tor n.

ruminate

(of plant parts) appearing chewed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But sometimes, rumination becomes unproductive or even detrimental to making good life choices.
Although the concept of troubled ruminations may be important at all stages of the life cycle, we suspect that it is most critical in emerging adulthood.
Fulton, Richard D., "The Plight of Part-timers in Higher Education: Some Ruminations and Suggestions" in Change, Vol.
The language of Catholic philosophers has, from their earliest ruminations, bristled with words such as rights, justice, dignity, freedom, equality, and so on.
Here he's in Brussels, and ruminations include whether Tintin is a gay icon (all that hanging around with men with big moustaches and sailors), and the reason behind the famous Manekin-Pis sculpture.
To his credit, he tackles current concerns about authority and power inequalities in ethnographic work while avoiding the paralyzing effect that such ruminations have often exercised on many cultural anthropologists.
With theoretical ruminations in the introduction her text presents great stories enriched with detail.
However, his artsy ruminations about God did not ever mean that the Christian religion was particularly resonant for him.
Beattie will have won many admirers for his sensitive ruminations on the nature of loss for the Astle family - although he might have kept the three paragraphs on the accidental loss of "the memory card for my PlayStation 2" which is "a godsend on long away trips", to himself.
Morose existential cowboys, ruminations on fleeting love, fast chopsticks that kill, kill, kill, and a giant slug named Laura hitchhiking to Winnipeg - it looks like Canadian filmmakers have more up their creative sleeves than pallid adventures of an all-male curling team.
We are treated to endless ruminations between her and her husband Baruch, a New York assistant district attorney who, during Blumenfeld's sojourn in Israel, is called away to prosecute boxing promoter Don King for fraud (thus providing Blumenfeld with an opportunity to pad her narrative with some irrelevant trial detail.) There are lengthy and self-indulgent excursions into Blumenfeld family dynamics, as well as trivial events that Blumenfeld strains to elevate to moments of grand significance, such as a half-dozen pages in which the author tries to trick her father into eating a plate of sugar wafers prepared by the family of the "mastermind" of the terrorist attacks.
Even though there is no shortage of books on the topic, As I Lay Dying is much removed from typical ruminations on death.