ruminate


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ruminate

(ro͞o′mə-nāt′)
v. rumi·nated, rumi·nating, rumi·nates
v.intr.
1. To turn a matter over and over in the mind.
2. To chew cud.
v.tr.
To reflect on over and over again.

ru′mi·na′tive adj.
ru′mi·na′tive·ly adv.
ru′mi·na′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ruminate

(of plant parts) appearing chewed.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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The term "ruminate," derived from the Latin rumino (chew; Periasamy, 1962a) or based on a similarity with the teeth of ruminants (Corner, 1966), refers to an uneven endosperm surface that is often highly enlarged by ingrowths or infoldings of the surrounding tissue.
The longer an animal feeds and ruminates, the longer will likely be the intake of nutrients, and also the better the processing of the ingested particles due to the rumination process, which will consequently lead to better performance, as demonstrated in this correlation.
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Now you can ruminate on the concerns of the 19th century instead.
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Finally, to read the Inquirer and ruminate on the problems confronting the nation.
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Act II's autobiographical "It's About Time" lags when Davison sets aside the first act's marvelous undercurrent of object manipulation to ruminate on timely concerns.