rudiment

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rudiment

 [roo´dĭ-ment]
1. an organ or part having little or no function but which has functioned at an earlier stage in the same individual or in his ancestors.

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-ment),
1. An organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
2. The first indication of a structure in the course of ontogeny.
Synonym(s): rudimentum
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

rudiment

/ru·di·ment/ (roo´dĭ-ment)
1. a structure that has remained undeveloped, or one with little or no function at present but which was functionally developed earlier.

rudiment

(ro͞o′də-mənt)
n.
Biology An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.

ru′di·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

rudiment

[ro̅o̅′dimənt]
Etymology: L, rudimentum, beginning
an organ or tissue that is incompletely developed or nonfunctional. rudimentary, adj.

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-mĕnt)
1. An organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
2. The first indication of a structure in the course of ontogeny.
Synonym(s): rudimentum.
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-mĕnt)
Organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

rudiment

1. primordium.
2. an organ or part that has failed to realize its potential function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Planktotrophic sea urchin larvae are developmentally plastic: in response to food scarcity, development of the juvenile rudiment is suspended and larvae instead develop elongated arms, thus increasing feeding capacity and extending larval life.
Antennae with 13-25 segments, elytron-and-wing- rudiments directed downward, slightly back, smooth to weak rugose (Fig.
For new arrivals to become citizens in the true sense of the word, they must be willing to learn the language and absorb these civilizational rudiments.
I taught him the rudiments of the magazine business in the early days and helped him make key business connections along the way.
Elementary Rudiments of Music and Elementary Rudiments of Music (Answer Book), Revised editions, by Barbara Wharram and Kathleen Wood.
Furthermore, building upon the rudiments of adult education extant an end goal for the field is presented.
Perhaps if they were to refuse admission to late comers or toilet goers until a suitable break in the performance then over time, like Pavlov's dogs, the ill mannered among the audience might even learn the rudiments of acceptable behaviour
Enhanced with a profusion of exercises ranging from 15-minute projects to semester-long whole-class assignments, Literacy strategies For Grades 4-12 will also prove invaluable for those working with teaching English-language learners the rudiments of reading in English.
Inspirational stories from golfer greats blend with fundamental principles of living and conducting business to explain the rudiments of developing that competitive edge.
She believed that, to become effective voters, women needed to understand the rudiments of voting: how and where to register, how to vote, and what to expect at the voting booths.
In 1933 the rudiments of the song were first heard by John Jacob Niles, recorded by him, and printed in textual form by him during five years of concertizing (www.