rubeosis iridis


Also found in: Wikipedia.

rubeosis

 [roo″be-o´sis]
redness.
rubeosis i´ridis a condition characterized by a new formation of vessels and connective tissue on the surface of the iris, frequently seen in diabetics.

rubeosis iridis

the formation of abnormal blood vessels on the anterior of the iris. It may be associated with diabetes mellitus, retinal ischemia, and neovascular glaucoma.

rubeosis iridis 

Neovascularization of the iris characterized by numerous coarse and irregular vessels on the surface and stroma of the iris. The new blood vessels may cover the trabecular meshwork, cause peripheral anterior synechia and give rise to secondary glaucoma. The most frequent causes are diabetes mellitus and central retinal vein occlusion. See neovascular glaucoma; iritis; retinal vein occlusion.

rubeosis

redness.

rubeosis iridis
a condition characterized by a new formation of vessels and connective tissue on the surface of the iris.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ophthalmic examination OS revealed raised intraocular pressure (37 mm Hg; reference interval 7-16 mm Hg), mydriasis, conjunctival and episcleral hyperemia, shallow anterior chamber due to anterior displacement of the lens and iris, rubeosis iridis, and engorgement of the pecten.
There was moderate rubeosis iridis but no posterior synechia were seen.
In people with diabetes, and those with suspected previous vascular occlusion, you should examine the iris carefully for evidence of rubeosis iridis prior to dilatation of the pupil.
Rubeosis iridis and retinoblastoma and pseudoglioma.
Rubeosis iridis in retinoblastoma: histologic findings and the possible role of vascular endothelial growth factor in its induction.
Neovascularisation of the iris (NVI), also known as rubeosis iridis, occurs when new blood vessels are created from preexisting iris capillaries found near the pupillary margin (Figure 1) (10) and iris root.
The most common, and indeed the most problematic, complication of rubeosis iridis is secondary neovascular glaucoma.
Complications include secondary cataract, rubeosis iridis, uveitis, secondary glaucoma, retinal detachment and phthisis bulbi (atrophy of non-functional eye).
Rubeosis iridis (NVI) may subsequently lead to the development of neovascular glaucoma.
In addition, the retinal ischaemia drives the development of rubeosis iridis.