rotavirus


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Related to rotavirus: norovirus, rotavirus gastroenteritis

rotavirus

 [ro´tah-vi″rus]
any member of a genus of reoviruses that have a wheellike appearance; they are transmitted by the fecal-oral route and cause acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea in infants and young children. There are 6 different antigenic groups.

ro·ta·vi·rus

(rō'tă-vī'rŭs),
A group of RNA viruses (family Reoviridae) wheellike in appearance, which comprise a genus, Rota virus, which includes the human gastroenteritis viruses (a major cause of infant diarrhea throughout the world). Separated into groups A-F, rotaviruses can infect a number of vertebrates. They are fastidious, and in vitro culture is difficult.
[L. rota, wheel, + virus]

rotavirus

/ro·ta·vi·rus/ (ro´tah-vi″rus) any member of the genus Rotavirus. ro´taviral

Rotavirus

/Ro·ta·vi·rus/ (ro´tah-vi″rus) rotaviruses; a genus of viruses of the family Reoviridae, having a wheel-like appearance, that cause acute infantile gastroenteritis and cause diarrhea in young children and many animal species.

rotavirus

(rō′tə-vī′rəs)
n. pl. rotavi·ruses
Any of a genus of wheel-shaped reoviruses, including one that causes gastroenteritis, especially in infants and newborn animals.

rotavirus

[rō′təvī′rəs]
a double-stranded ribonucleic acid virus that appears as a tiny wheel, with a clearly defined outer layer, or rim, and an inner layer of spokes. The virus replicates in the epithelial cells of the intestine and is a cause of acute gastroenteritis with diarrhea, particularly in infants. Rotavirus is the most common cause worldwide of severe diarrheal illness in children, with fecal-oral transmission. Various strains also infect domestic and wild animals. In the United States, infections tend to peak during the winter months. A licensed live virus vaccine is no longer recommended because of its association with a rare case of bowel obstruction (intussusception).

Ro·ta·vi·rus

(rō'tă-vī'rŭs)
A genus of RNA viruses that includes the human gastroenteritis viruses (a major cause of infant diarrhea throughout the world).
Synonym(s): gastroenteritis virus type B.
[L. rota, wheel, + virus]

ro·ta·vi·rus

(Rv, RV) (rō'tă-vī'rŭs)
A group of RNA viruses of wheellike appearance, which comprise a genus, Rotavirus, which includes the human gastroenteritis viruses (a major cause of infant diarrhea throughout the world).
[L. rota, wheel, + virus]

Ro·ta·vi·rus

(rō'tă-vī'rŭs)
A genus of RNA viruses that includes the human gastroenteritis viruses.
Synonym(s): gastroenteritis virus type B.
[L. rota, wheel, + virus]

Rotavirus

a genus in the family Reoviridae which cause diarrhea in the young of many species, including avian, but particularly calves, foals, piglets and lambs, particularly in conditions of poor hygiene, crowding and failure of maternal antibody transfer. The morbidity rate is usually very high but death losses are not heavy provided the hydration of the animals is maintained. There is some species specialization but interspecies transmission is common.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine RotaTeq(R) in Finnish infants up to 3 years of age: the Finnish Extension Study.
According to health experts, diarrhoea is one of the world's leading killers of children, and rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea.
Los rotavirus (RV) son virus ARN (acido ribonucleico) pertenecientes a la familia Reoviridae, miden 100 nm y tienen una estructura caracteristica en forma de rueda (rota).
Public health campaigns to combat rotavirus focus on providing oral rehydration therapy for infected children and vaccination to prevent the disease.
Many infants hospitalized in the NICU are preterm patients who remain there past 104 days, the age by which the first rotavirus vaccine dose should be administered, and are at higher risk for rotavirus after discharge.
According to a recent editorial in the British Medical Journal, more than 40 countries currently include a rotavirus vaccine in routine childhood immunisation.
The samples were frozen and stored on ice at -20[degrees]C prior to use for rotavirus agarose gel electrophoresis and PCR genotyping.
The fact that the new initiative is free shows the seriousness of HD in beating the rotavirus bug.
According to HD statistics, rotavirus infection tripled in 2012 to over 500 cases from 2011 and 2010.
Assuming that the price of rotavirus vaccine purchased for public health programmes would be near the market price, it was concluded that rotavirus vaccination is not cost-effective in European model countries including UK (1).
Rotavirus surveillance data were collected through sentinel hospitals participating in the African Rotavirus Surveillance Network (ARSN), which was established in four countries in 2006 and had expanded to 29 countries by 2016 (Figure) (6).
Professor Shaikh highlighted that globally 700,000 children under five die of diarrhea while rotavirus kills more than 197,000 (28 per cent) children.