rotator


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ro·ta·tor mus·cle

1. one of the rotatores (muscles);
2. muscle that produces a rotation, alone or in concert with other rotators, around an axis, for example, rotator muscles of vertebral column.
Synonym(s): musculus rotator [TA], rotator

ro·ta·to·res (mus·cles)

[TA]
deepest of the three layers of transversospinalis muscles, chiefly developed in the thoracic region; they arise from the transverse process of one vertebra and are inserted into the root of the spinous process of the next two or three vertebrae above; action, traditionally described as a column, it is more likely that these muscles, provided with a very high density of muscle spindles, are organs of proprioception; nerve supply, dorsal primary rami of the spinal nerves.
Synonym(s): musculi rotatores [TA]

rotator

(rō′tā′tər)
n.
1. One that rotates.
2. pl. rotatores (rō′tə-tôr′ēz) Anatomy A muscle that serves to rotate a part of the body.

rotator

[rō′tātər]
Etymology: L, rotare, to rotate
a muscle that rotates a structure around its axis, as the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar musculi rotatores, which function to extend and rotate the vertebral column toward the opposite side.

ro·ta·tor

(rō'tā-tŏr)
A muscle by which a part can be turned circularly.
See also: rotation

rotator

muscle which on contraction moves a body part through all/part of a circle

rotator

an obstetrical instrument used in cows and mares. See rotation fork.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rotator cuff repair: the effect of double-row fixation on three-dimensional repair site.
The purpose of this study is to assess the learning curve in using ultrasound to detect rotator cuff tears for a single sports medicine fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon.
If combined lesions are diagnosed in non-athletes, there can be seen good clinical and subjective outcomes in treating both arthroscopically in one surgery (6) or even only repairing the rotator cuff and treat the labral tear conservatively, as aging soft tissue favors stability (7).
Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injury, with more than 600,000 repair procedures performed annually in the United States.
If you like baseball, you've probably heard about a pitcher suffering a rotator cuff tear.
The French study included 90 patients who underwent rotator cuff surgery.
All of a sudden, we've noticed that customers in this region are paying particular attention to the rotator segment, which was never the case historically," he pointed out.
The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that form a cuff of tendon on the upper end of the arm.
This represents approximately 70% of my practice, and this is almost evenly split between rotator cuff repair and fixing dislocating shoulders.
He explains that rotator cuff surgery done with current methods has a failure rate that ranges from 20-90 percent, due in large part to the manner in which the tendons are reattached to the bone.
The rotator cuff consists of four muscles (attached to bone by their tendons) of the upper arm that raise and rotate the arm.
A Most people think rotator cuff injuries are limited to young athletes, but most such injuries occur in people age 55 and older, and mostly from repetitive activities that cause gradual degeneration.