rose bengal

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rose ben·gal

(rōz' ben'găl), [C.I. 45440]
The sodium salt of tetraiodotetra-chlorfluorescein, used as a stain for bacteria, as a stain in the diagnosis of keratitis sicca, and formerly in liver function tests.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rose ben·gal

(rōz' beng'găl)
[C.I. 45440] A fluorescein derivative used as a biologic stain.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rose bengal

A biological stain that can be applied to the cornea as eye drops to reveal subtle damage to the outer layer (epithelium). A brand name is Minims Rose Bengal.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

rose bengal 

An iodine derivative of fluorescein having vital staining properties but unlike fluorescein it is a true histological stain, which binds strongly and selectively to cellular components. The colour of this stain is red. It has the disadvantage of causing some pain in a good percentage of eyes. It stains dead or degenerated epithelial cells but not normal cells and is used to help in the diagnosis of corneal abrasion, keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, lagophthalmos, etc. See fluorescein; lissamine green.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
diagnosis of brucellosis is only made after the causative organism is unexpectedly detected in cultures of blood or exudates specimens or serological test like: Rose Bengal test (18).
The Rose Bengal test antigen used was sourced from IDvet Innovative Diagnostics, France.
The Rose Bengal test, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs-Ag), anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV), and anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) were negative, and the patient was not HLA-B27 positive.
In addition to standard tests (Schirmer test, TBUT, fluorescein and rose bengal test), they also performed specific measurements of osmolarity and evaporation, and meibomian gland function analysis.
[6] There are numerous commercial kits and serological methods commonly used and recommended, including the Rose Bengal test, serum tube agglutination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
Sera from 110 volunteers were collected and analyzed by employing serology (Rose Bengal Test, competitive ELISA, FPA) and serum PCR assay.
Table 1: Characteristics of the study population Characteristics Number Total number of patients 70(136) Age group >20 years Schirmer test positive 56 eyes Tear film break up time positive 26 eyes Rose Bengal test positive 51 eyes Dry eye present (2 or more tests positive) 34 patients (56 eyes) Dry eye absent 36 patients (80eyes) The total number of patients examined in our study was 70.
All serum samples were tested according to requirements of the World Organisation for Animal Health for diagnosis of brucellosis in small ruminants by using by the Rose Bengal test (RBT) and the complement fixation test (CFT) (7), and by indirect ELISA (IDEXX, Montpellier, France) and competitive ELISA (cELISA; Ingenasa, Madrid, Spain).
Serological test like the rose Bengal test (RBT), slow agglutination test (SAT), mercaptoethanol test, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and complement fixation test (Islam et al., 1983) are generally used for the detection of Brucella infection in animals.
If one of either the Rose Bengal test or the Wright agglutination test was positive, then the patient was accepted to be seropositive.1 All individuals were examined by an otolaryngologist.