root

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root

 [roōt]
1. the descending and subterranean part of a plant.
2. that portion of an organ, such as a tooth, hair, or nail, that is buried in the tissues, or by which it arises from another structure, or the part of a nerve that is adjacent to the center to which it is connected.
Tooth anomalies with variations in root form. From Darby and Walsh, 1994.
anterior root the anterior, or motor, division of each spinal nerve, attached centrally to the spinal cord and joining peripherally with the posterior root to form the nerve before it emerges from the intervertebral foramen; it conveys motor fibers to skeletal muscle and contains preganglionic autonomic fibers at the thoracolumbar and sacral levels. Called also ventral root.
dorsal root posterior root.
motor root anterior root.
nerve r's the series of paired bundles of nerve fibers which emerge at each side of the spinal cord, termed dorsal (or posterior) or ventral (or anterior) according to their position. There are 31 pairs (8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal), each corresponding dorsal and ventral root joining to form a spinal nerve. Certain cranial nerves, e.g., the trigeminal, also have nerve roots.
posterior root the posterior, or sensory, division of each spinal nerve, attached centrally to the spinal cord and joining peripherally with the anterior root to form the nerve before it emerges from the intervertebral foramen; each posterior root bears a spinal ganglion that conveys sensory fibers to the spinal cord. Called also dorsal root.
sensory root posterior root.
ventral root anterior root.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

root

(rūt), [TA]
1. The primary or beginning portion of any part, as of a nerve at its origin from the brainstem or spinal cord. Synonym(s): radix (1)
2. Synonym(s): root of tooth
3. The descending underground portion of a plant; it absorbs water and nutrients, provides support, and stores nutrients.
4. Loosely used to denote the etiology of a process, event, or conflict requiring solutions to allow mitigation. For roots of pharmacologic significance that are not listed below, see specific names.
[A.S. rot]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

root

(ro͞ot, ro͝ot)
n.
1. The embedded part of an organ or structure such as a hair, tooth, or nerve, that serves as a base or support.
2. A primary source; an origin; radix.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

root

Australian slang for:
noun Sexual intercourse.
 
verb To engage in sexual intercourse.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

root

(rūt) [TA]
1. The primary or beginning portion of any part, as of a nerve at its origin from the brainstem or spinal cord.
Synonym(s): radix (1) [TA] .
2. Synonym(s): root of tooth.
3. The descending underground portion of a plant; it absorbs water and nutrients, provides support, and stores nutrients.
[A.S. rot]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Fig. 271 Root. Transverse section of a typical dicotyledon (buttercup) root.click for a larger image
Fig. 271 Root. Transverse section of a typical dicotyledon (buttercup) root.

root

that part of a plant which (usually) grows below ground. The root provides anchorage for the aerial parts, absorbs water and mineral salts from the soil, conducts water and nutrients to other parts of the plant, and often stores food materials over winter. Root structure is variable among higher plants, but generally the root, unlike the young STEM, has a central core of conducting tissue (the STELE) which also serves as a strong structural element, assisting the root as it pushes downwards and resisting upward pressures from the aerial parts.

Roots can be classified into three main types: primary, secondary (see LATERAL ROOT), and ADVENTITIOUS (1). The primary root of ANGIOSPERMS develops from the radicle of the seedling. Later, secondary roots emerge from the top of the primary root and then further down. At the apex of the root is a protective ROOT CAP. The typical root structure of a DICOTYLEDON is shown in Fig. 271.

In MONOCOTYLEDONS the number of xylem ‘arms’ is usually much greater than in DICOTYLEDONS, 12 to 20 in monocotyledons, 2 to 5 in dicotyledons. Roots frequently undergo SECONDARY THICKENING in dicotyledons, but not in monocotyledons.

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

root

(rūt) [TA]
1. Primary or beginning portion of any part, as of a nerve at its origin from the brainstem or spinal cord.
2. Synonym(s): root of tooth.
3. Loosely used to denote the etiology of a process, event, or conflict requiring solutions to allow mitigation.
[A.S. rot]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about root

Q. How much does a root canal hurt? I have to get a root canal for my bottom tooth. I was wondering how much they hurt. And do you have any suggestions that help distract from the pain? Thanks.

A. i did one about two years ago- even the injection wasn't too bad! didn't feel a thing. but after the anesthesia worn off it hurt. but then the dentist told me to take Advil or any other NSAID and it helped.

More discussions about root
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References in periodicals archive ?
An in vitro comparison of the sealing ability of materials placed in lateral root perforations. J Endod 1990;16(1):19-23.
Sealing ability of a mineral trioxide aggregate for repair of lateral root perforations. Journal of Endodontics 1993;19(11):541-4.
Fuss, "Diagnosis and treatment of accidental root perforations," Endodontic Topics, vol.
Torabinejad, "Repair of root perforations using mineral trioxide aggregate: a long-term study," Journal of Endodontics, vol.
Systemic conditions, medications, teeth with an open apex and internal resorption and acute apical periodontitis may be associated excessive bleeding, and be confused with root perforation. Clinically, its diagnosis is a challenge; (10,12,14) however, the apex locator is a technological resource that may help in diagnosing root perforation.
An essential factor to consider is whether or not an endodontically treated tooth is associated with a root perforation. The diagnosis of root perforation in endodontically treated teeth may be complex.
MTA over other restorative materials has been considered as a material of choice for repairing root perforations, as it has not only shown biocompatibility (1) to the surrounding periradicular tissue but also has demonstrated the ability to allow regeneration of hard tissue like cementum, thus facilitating the regeneration of periodontal apparatus (1).
17 Holland R,OtoboniFilho JA, Souza Aet al.Mineral trioxide aggregate repair of lateral root perforations. Journal of Endodontics.
Root perforations have been classified by Fuss and Trope as coronal, crestal, and apical perforation: Coronal perforation--coronal to the level of crestal bone and epithelial attachment with minimal damage to the supporting tissues and easy access, crestal perforation--at the level of the epithelial attachment into the crestal bone, and apical perforation--apical to the crestal bone and the epithelial attachment.
Root perforations can occur pathologically as a result of resorption and caries or iatrogenically during root canal treatment.
In conclusion, root perforations are severe complications which affect the prognosis of endodontic procedures.