root hair


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root hair

n.
A thin hairlike outgrowth of an epidermal cell of a plant root that absorbs water and minerals from the soil.

root hair

a hair-like outgrowth from the epidermis of roots. Root hairs occur in large numbers in a zone behind the growing tip, are short-lived, and greatly increase the absorbing area of the root.
References in periodicals archive ?
The root surface area, including that of root hairs, in order to express Imax per cm2 divided the influx measured in the field mol cm-1s-1.
However, it was possible also to notice some interesting differences dealing with the presence, in adventitious roots, of numerous root hairs in the elongation zone of adventitious root compared to embryonic ones.
LP environments, including greater root hair length and density (Yan et al., 2004), greater root exudation of acid (Yan et al., 2004), more shallow deployment of basal roots (Liao et al., 2004), greater cortical aerenchyma formation (Fan et al., 2003), and greater production of adventitious roots (Miller et al., 2003).
Bates TR, Lynch JP (2000) Plant growth and phosphorus accumulation of wild type and two root hair mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (brassicacae).
The cross sections of roots in un-compacted soil had a regular outline with the epidermis composed of smaller cells and lots of root hairs, whereas in the compacted soil the epidermal cells and some cortex cells were damaged with the remnants occupying the outside of the root.
root in control group (2A) and after treatment of seeds with aqueous extracts of very young leaves at concentrations of 1%, 3% and 5%(2B, 2C, 2D) Rh: Root hair, Ep: Epidermis, P: Parenchyma, En: Endodermis, Pc: Peripheral cycle, Xy: Xylem, Ph: Phloem, Pi: Pith.
"PCR enabled us to quickly determine which sequences were most highly expressed in root hair cells, where sorgoleone is made, compared with other parts of the plant," says Baerson.
After about an hour of searching on their first day, the brothers realized that one "root hair" was moving.
The root hair length was not affected by the osmotic agent--mannitol or the water potential of the substrate.
The most striking example of cellular differentiation in the root epidermis is the initiation and development of root hairs. In the majority of plant species, any protoderm cell has the potential to form a root hair.
He further said, they adhere to the roots and the microscopic root hairs of plants and within the fibrous media, adding that microbes and bacteria secrete sticky extra-cellular proteins forming biofilms.