root caries


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Related to root caries: root caries index

root car·ies

caries of the root surface of a tooth, usually appearing as a broad shallow defect in the area of the cementoenamel junction.

root caries

Caries on the root of a tooth. The root is more susceptible to decay than the rest of the tooth due to the lack of an enamel covering, difficulty in maintaining a clean root surface, and the lack of effective preventive therapies.
See also: caries

root car·ies

(rūt karēz)
Caries of root surface of a tooth, usually appearing as a broad shallow defect in area of cementoenamel junction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk indicators associated with root caries in independently living older adults.
Interestingly, root caries were present in only 13% of teeth, despite the high prevalence of periodontitis.
Another study investigated preventing the development of root caries in the geriatric population living in senior homes.
Reduced salivary flow can lead to multiple problems such as root caries, periodontal disease, inability to chew food properly, loss of taste sensation, and often ultimate tooth loss.
Reversal of primary root caries using dentifrices containing 5,000 and 1,100 ppm fluoride.
In vitro growth, acidogenicity and cariogenicity of predominant human root caries flora.
Root caries occur when these bacteria invade the tooth root below the gum line.
There are also some physical factors that affect ECM results; these factors include temperature of the tooth, thickness of the tissue, and the hydration of the material.6 A clinical trial on root caries suggested that dentine may be a more suitable tissue for ECM.11,12 There is also a good evidence to suggest that ECM is capable of longitudinal monitoring and, clinicians may use the device to monitor attempts at re-mineralization, till root caries lesions are possible arrested.11 Another application of electronic monitoring of caries is Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS).
Evidenced-based guidelines on the use of professionally applied fluoride agents has found that fluoride varnish or APF Gel applied every six months is beneficial in preventing root caries in adults.
When root caries is a concern, since dentine is more soluble than enamel, fluoride toothpaste is expected to be less effective in controlling dentin caries than in controlling enamel caries.
The third study evaluated the effects of probiotics and fluoride on root caries in 4 groups of elderly adults.