root caries


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to root caries: root caries index

root car·ies

caries of the root surface of a tooth, usually appearing as a broad shallow defect in the area of the cementoenamel junction.

root caries

decay in the dentine and/or the cementum of a tooth.

root caries

Caries on the root of a tooth. The root is more susceptible to decay than the rest of the tooth due to the lack of an enamel covering, difficulty in maintaining a clean root surface, and the lack of effective preventive therapies.
See also: caries

root car·ies

(rūt karēz)
Caries of root surface of a tooth, usually appearing as a broad shallow defect in area of cementoenamel junction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, root caries were present in only 13% of teeth, despite the high prevalence of periodontitis.
48) For adults, where root caries is a concern, a high-fluoride toothpaste may be an option.
Root caries occur when these bacteria invade the tooth root below the gum line.
Consequently, the root caries may have missed detection in the participants that is very difficult in the absence of radiographs.
Therefore, since dentine is more susceptible to caries than enamel, (1,2) the concern about prevention of root caries is increasing.
Scenario #2: Long-term care resident, well-educated female in her 70s, evidence of cognitive decline, full dentition, poor oral hygiene, high caries risk, root caries eventually amputating most teeth despite efforts to restore.
The third study evaluated the effects of probiotics and fluoride on root caries in 4 groups of elderly adults.
Root caries lesions were defined as soft, progressive, destructive lesions, either totally confined to the root surface or involving undermining of enamel at the cemento-enamel junction but clinically indicating the lesion initiated on the root surface (Katz, 1980).
Exposed root surfaces are more likely to develop root sensitivity and root caries.
He added that root caries is a growing problem in older adults as the incidence of lesions increases due to root exposure.
Evidence did not adequately support use of 10 to 40% CHX varnish for prevention of coronal caries in children or root caries in adults.