role reversal

(redirected from role reversals)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

role reversal

the act of assuming the role of another person to appreciate how the person feels, perceives, and behaves in relation to himself or herself and to others.
References in periodicals archive ?
The novel is based on the concept that friction has occurred between Queen and Prince Philip because of the role reversals in their marriage.
I enjoy role reversals in the characters I depict and here the little old lady is seemingly more passionate than the two stereotype England fans.
It was Gore's best performance since 'A River Runs Through It,' which debuted last month in New Hampshire," joked Nicholson, who cited the Hollywood meeting as "just one more acting triumph in a long career of role reversals, quick costume changes and special effects.
10 /PRNewswire/ -- In a role reversal that would make Robert DeNiro jealous, Vice President Al Gore -- normally typecast by his staff as an opponent of violence in movies -- surprised audiences in Tinsel Town last month, reprising his role as a cynical, shallow Washington pol willing to compromise his positions for campaign cash.
This negative correlation actually indicates a significant positive relationship between higher self-esteem and fewer inappropriate role reversals.
The significant correlation between a positive sense of self-esteem and appropriate knowledge concerning role reversals was consistent across both times.
It is hypothesized that higher self-esteem will correlate positively with more appropriate knowledge concerning role reversal, empathy, developmental expectations, and the use of corporal punishment.
The Role Reversal subscale measures whether the parent uses the child to satisfy the parent's needs (e.
005, between baseline self-esteem and role reversal at measurement time two, when the baby was six months old.
This significant correlation between role reversal and maternal self-esteem in adolescent mothers supports the theoretical perspective that self-esteem, as an indicator of role identity, is predictive of parenting.
Thus, the data support the construct that self-esteem, which is an indicator of role identity, is a predictor of role reversal, which is viewed as an indicator of role confusion.