roentgen


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roentgen

 [rent´gen]
the international unit of x- or γ-radiation; it is the quantity of x- or γ-radiation such that the associated corpuscular emission per 0.001293 g of air produces, in air, ions carrying 1 electrostatic unit of electrical charge of either sign. Abbreviated R.

Roent·gen

(rĕnt'gĕn),
Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923. Discovered x-rays in November, 1895; awarded Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 for his discovery. See: roentgen, roentgen ray.

roent·gen (R, r),

(rĕnt'gĕn, rent'chen),
The international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays; that quantity of radiation that will produce, in 1 cc or 0.001293 g of air at STP, 2.08 × 109 ions of both signs, each totaling 1 electrostatic unit (esu) of charge; in the MKS system this is 2.58 × 10-4 coulombs per kg of air.
[Wilhelm K. Roentgen]

roentgen

also

röntgen

(rĕnt′gən, -jən, rŭnt′-)
n. Abbr. R or r
A unit of radiation exposure equal to the quantity of ionizing radiation that will produce one electrostatic unit of electricity in one cubic centimeter of dry air at 0°C and standard atmospheric pressure.

roent′gen adj.

roent·gen

(r, R) (rent'gen)
The international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays; that quantity of radiation that will produce in 1 cm of air at STP, or 0.001293 g of air, 2.08 × 109 ions of both signs, each totaling 1 electrostatic unit (e.s.u.) of charge; in the MKS system this is 2.58 × 10-4 coulombs per kg of air.
[Wilhelm K. Roentgen]

Roentgen

or

Röntgen, Wilhelm Konrad

(1845–1923) German physicist who discovered X-RAYS. A roentgen or röntgen is the quantity of X-rays or gamma radiation used as a unit of radioactivity. Symbol: R or r.

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph
References in periodicals archive ?
Dana takes a heart X-ray and the roentgen photography shows the entire 25th Class of Military Academy, in her heart." And concludes: "If we now start "taking pictures", who knows what we will find in everyone of us under the roentgen rays" [8].
Furniture at this level of rarity would have been ordered by Roentgen''s aristocratic patrons through a middle man, a negotiator, who would sell a diamond necklace to cover a gambling debt perhaps, or purchase on behalf of the client a Chippendale dining table or a set of rare prints from an Italian dealer.
In 1901, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen was awarded the first Nobel Prize in physics for his work.
Fortunately for us, Fleming and Roentgen weren't working for the USDA.
Cnrs alsace: cronenbourg campus, 23 rue du loess 67037 strasbourg and esplanade campus: 2 konrad roentgen alley, 12 rue du general zimmer, 5 blaise pascal street 67000 strasbourg and is2m - mulhouse campus: 15 rue jean starcky, 68057 mulhouse
'Roentgen rays' was the original name for which medicallyused form of electromagnetic radiation?
The sensational discovery of X-ray radiation (a form of electromagnetic radiation that occurs when high velocity electrons collide with a metal target within a glass vacuum tube), officially attributed to Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, a German physicist and professor at several universities in Germany, led to increased interweaving between physics and medicine and gave impetus to further research in these scientific fields [12, 25, 28, 31].
1895: German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen published a paper on his studies of a new type of ray, which he dubbed the X-ray.
According to the German Aerospace Centre, the 2.7-tonne Roentgen Satellite, or ROSAT, slammed into Earth's atmosphere sometime between 01:45 GMT (6:15 IST) and 02:15 GMT (6:45 IST) on Sunday.
and Worcester District medical societies, the American College of Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, New England Roentgen Ray Society, Mass.
On November 8, 1895, German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen was trying to repeat an experiment in which cathode rays light up salts and darken a photographic plate.
The paper on mammographic computer-aided diagnosis by Padayachee, Alport (Department of physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal) and Rae (Department of Medical Physics, University of the Free State) is a reminder that radiology was founded by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, himself a physicist.