pigeon

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pigeon

a member of the family Columbidae which also includes the doves. The domestic pigeons are generally gray, medium-sized birds which exist in a large number of breeds and races including Romans, Jacobins, tumblers, fantails, pouters, carrier pigeons and turtle-doves.

pigeon berry
phytolaccaamericana.
pigeon breast
deep-seated abscesses in the pectoral muscles of horses. Called also pectoral abscess.
pigeon-breeder's lung
see bird-fancier's lung.
carrier pigeon
pigeon with strong homing instincts used to carry messages over relatively long distances. Produced by breeding and selection between races of domestic pigeons. See also homing pigeon (below).
pigeon circovirus
the cause of lethargy, respiratory and gastrointestinal signs and poor racing performance in young pigeons.
pigeon fly
a member of the parasitic fly family Hippoboscidae or louse fly and an important parasite of domestic pigeon. Called also Pseudolynchia canariensis.
pigeon grass
panicum whitei, setaria spp.
pigeon herpesvirus
the cause of respiratory disease (coryza) in domestic pigeons.
homing pigeon
pigeon with strong homing instincts used in racing and as a carrier pigeon (above). Produced by breeding and selection between races of domestic pigeon.
pigeon pox
slender (small) pigeon louse
columbicolacolumbae.
pigeon strongyle
ornithostrongylusquadriradiatus.
pigeon toed
a condition in which the toes are turned inwards.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Rock Dove is blue-gray in general body color with two black wing bars and a greenish-purplish sheen around the neck and upper breast.
The male Rock Dove (Columba livia; Darwin's pigeons precursor) introduces this display by launching off a building or cliff face with exaggeratedly slow, deep wing-beats.
Goodwin (1983) noted that during the glide phase domestic pigeons hold their wings higher up the back than the ancestral rock dove.
The Java Fantail, he noted, is the link between the Rock Dove and the Fantail, having an intermediate number of tail feathers and having the tail carried slightly above the body.
Whereas Darwin (1868) considered the blue-bar of the extant Rock Dove the older character state and the checker of some conspecific individuals the derived state, Whitman (1919) argued that in fact checker probably occurred in the ancestral columbiform and that the expression of this pattern is somehow masked in most species during evolution.
Whitman (1919) noted that in extant Rock Dove populations checker does appear as a rare mutation whereas the two-bar is the rule.
Darwin used different breeds of the Rock Dove known at his time to support his argument for selection, an engine leading to descent with modification.
Geese, chickens, House Sparrows, and Rock Doves in Queens all had high-level seroprevalences, consistent with the exposure of these species to WN virus in the Romanian outbreak of 1996 (9).
Rock Doves were similarly incompetent, but House Sparrows maintained infectious-level viremia for several days (CDC, unpub, data).
northeastern Queens); 2) at least some, if not all, WN virus activity in northeastern Queens occurred in 1999; 3) certain species such as geese, chickens, House Sparrows, and Rock Doves were frequently infected and are likely to serve as effective WN virus sentinels in urban transmission foci; and 4) House Sparrows in particular served as hosts for most of the avian WN virus infections in the bird populations we sampled in northeastern Queens and appear to be an important reservoir host there.
Modern pigeon fanciers recognize hundreds of domesticated breeds, most of them so different from wild rock doves that Charles Darwin once said he found it hard to believe the flamboyant birds shared a single wild ancestor.
If rock doves like to live on cliffs, why do so many of them live in cities?