rite of passage

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rite of passage

n. pl. rites of passage
A ritual or ceremony signifying an event in a person's life indicative of a transition from one stage to another, as from adolescence to adulthood.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) The liminal periods of rites of passages are times to think about communal, social, political, and religious identities.
In A Guide to Surviving Academia: Navigating the Rites of Passage (2011), the editors Emily Lenning, Sara Brighton, and Susan Caringella do not consider the postdoctorate an integral step in their sketch of the academic lifespan.
In this context, the metaphorical scheme of rites of passage risks moving contemporary scholars away from an understanding of various realities rather than helping them towards one.
"The book is a culmination of everything I've done at KINKS for the past ten years and it also includes the loctician rites of passage program curriculum," says Hatchett.
"Rites of passage were provided by the church and it has continued to provide them but now people are stopping using them.
Back at home, flipping across TV channels past one reality show after another, it was easy to see how these same rites of passage often lead to fame and fortune as well.
We should strive for a simpler way of celebrating these Catholic rites of passage. I think they should be events focused on the meaning, and the takeaway should be small lessons that will carry with us our whole lives.
Our cover story, "Rites of Passage," (page 18) describes considerations for insurers moving into and pulling out of Australia and New Zealand.
The rites of passage model, while not denying the fundamental psychological insights shared by deans, incorporated a more macro, sociological perspective, and underscored "sense-making" from the dean's social and ceremonial events.
Arnold van Gennep, the first one to coin the phrase "rites of passage," also introduced the notion of "liminality." (31) The Latin, limen, means, literally, "threshold." Thus, those in a liminal state are "on the threshold" between one existence and another.
"Purchasing her first bra, experiencing her first period and going on her first date are all rites of passage for a young girl," writes Carol Beck in Nourishing Your Daughter (Perigee; $13.95).