riot-control agent


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ri·ot-con·trol a·gent

(rī'ŏt kŏn-trōl' ā'jĕnt)
Any of several chemical compounds used to produce temporary irritation of the eyes, throat, and upper airway in crowd-control settings. Riot-control agents are typically solids that can be dissolved in organic solvents and dispersed as powders, solutions, or smoke. Because they are not gases, the term "tear gas" is a misnomer for these agents. Vomiting agents (q.v.) are a subset of riot-control agents.
See also: tear gas, lacrimator, vomiting agent, CA, CN, CS, CR, DM
References in periodicals archive ?
CS gas is the active component in tear gas, which is used as a riot-control agent, and causes burning in the throat and nose.
Then Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld actually commented on this situation, complaining in testimony to the House Armed Services Committee that " [i]n many instances, our forces are allowed to shoot somebody and kill them, but they're not allowed to use a nonlethal riot-control agent." (16) On the other hand, since the Chemical Weapon Convention allows for the use of RCA in law enforcement, including domestic riot control situations, (17) it could perhaps be argued that the use of RCA is actually permitted in military operations other than war.
It cited an unnamed source as saying: "There have been some reports that it was just a strong riot-control agent but this is not the case -- it's something else, although it can't definitively be said to be sarin nerve agent." The Ministry of Defence had no comment when contacted by AFP, although the Foreign Office said it was deeply concerned about the possible use of chemical weapons.
"There have been some reports that it was just a strong riot-control agent but this is not the case - it's something else, although it can't definitively be said to be sarin nerve agent," one source told the Times.
The first argument involves reclassifying calmatives as a riot-control agent. One Pentagon document from 1999 notes that "calmative and gastrointestinal convulsives, if classified as riot control agents, can be acceptable." Other Pentagon documents suggest shifting the funding for studies of calmatives to the Justice Department or Energy Department to avoid legal problems, and that is just what has happened.
Aside from ineffective psychological techniques, CS gas (a riot-control agent) was the only nonlethal tool employed.
CS gas is the active component in tear gas, which used as a riot-control agent, and causes burning in the throat and nose.