RIND

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RIND

See Reversible ischemic neurological disability.

RIND

(rīnd)
Reversible ischemic neurological deficit, a stroke whose clinical presentation lasts for a short time and then resolves. Despite the short duration of symptoms or signs, images of the brain taken after RIND often reveal infarction.

rind

(rīnd) [AS.]
A thick or firm outer coating of an organ, plant, or animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pork rinds don't raise blood sugar levels for the simple reason because it doesn't contain any sugars or carbohydrates.
LAHORE:Family of a artist Qutub Rind has claimed that he was killed under false charges of blasphemy a few days back in Lahore.
He used to offer prayers five times a day," he added, denying that Rind could've ever committed blasphemy.
Epic uses pork raised without antibiotics, and the rinds are guaranteed gluten-free, with zero carbs and not fried in vegetable oil.
Regarding the murder case against him, Rind's lawyer stated, He has been granted bail in the case and I have submitted a copy of it.
* Pork Cracklins, like pork rinds, are produced from pellets and have a hearty crunch and distinct bacon flavour, derived from thicker and meatier raw material.
Claiming that Rinds previous nomination papers stated that he held a Masters degree, his counsel added, I made a conscious decision to not mention that.
One by one, coat the thigh's outside with the mayonnaise mixture and then coat with the crushed pork rinds (pressing them in firmly) and set onto an oven-safe wire rack.
To assemble the lemon slices, arrange the lemon rinds on a sheet pan.
125g fine asparagus, trimmed and halved; 250g fresh spaghetti; grated rind and juice of 2 limes; grated rind of 1 lemon; 300ml double cream; salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
The company is using the other portion of the Monroe City Rinds. Arrow is investing $128,000 and plans to add three new jobs.
Pork Rinds breathe new life into a snack food category that really hasn't changed much over the past 50 years," says Alan Sussna, president and CEO.