rimexolone


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rimexolone

 [rĭ-mek´sah-lōn″]
a corticosteroid used in topical treatment of inflammation following eye surgery and of uveitis affecting the anterior structures of the eye.

rimexolone

/ri·mex·o·lone/ (rĭ-mek´sah-lōn″) a corticosteroid used as a topical antiinflammatory in the treatment of inflammation following eye surgery and of uveitis affecting the anterior structures of the eye.

rimexolone

[r-mek′sah-lōn′]
a corticosteroid used in topical treatment of inflammation after eye surgery and of uveitis affecting the anterior structures of the eye.

antiinflammatory drug 

A drug which inhibits or suppresses most inflammatory responses of an allergic, bacterial, traumatic or anaphylactic origin, as well as being immunosuppressant. They include the corticosteroids (e.g. betamethasone, dexamethasone, fluorometholone, hydrocortisone acetate, loteprednol etabonate, prednisolone, rimexolone, triamcinolone). They are sometimes combined with an antibiotic drug (e.g. betamethasone combined with neomycin or sulfacetamide, dexamethasone combined with neomycin or polymyxin B). Corticosteroids have side effects, such as enhancing the activity of herpes simplex virus, fungal overgrowth, raising intraocular pressure or cataract formation.There are other antiinflammatory drugs that are non-steroidal (NSAID) and have little toxicity. They act mainly by blocking prostaglandin synthesis. These include diclofenac sodium, flurbiprofen sodium, indomethacin, ketorolac, nepafenac and oxyphenbutazone. See immunosuppressants; steroid.

rimexolone (rimek´səlōn),

n brand name: Vexol;
drug class: corticosteroid;
action: interacts with steroid cytoplasmic receptors to induce antiinflammatory effects;
uses: inflammation of the eye associated with ocular surgery and uveitis.
References in classic literature ?
Don't you think, dear, that as these girls are used to such things, and the best we can do will be nothing new, that some simpler plan would be pleasanter to them, as a change if nothing more, and much better for us than buying or borrowing what we don't need, and attempting a style not in keeping with our circumstances?
He regretted the fate that had not let him live in a simpler and sweeter time when at the beckoning of some strange cloud in the sky men left their lands and houses and went forth into the wilderness to create new races.
Cutter could have got home a day earlier than his wife by any one of a dozen simpler devices; he could have left her in the Omaha hotel, and said he was going on to Chicago for a few days.
My explanation of the matter is a much simpler one.
The questionable sound of Silas's loom, so unlike the natural cheerful trotting of the winnowing-machine, or the simpler rhythm of the flail, had a half-fearful fascination for the Raveloe boys, who would often leave off their nutting or birds'-nesting to peep in at the window of the stone cottage, counterbalancing a certain awe at the mysterious action of the loom, by a pleasant sense of scornful superiority, drawn from the mockery of its alternating noises, along with the bent, tread-mill attitude of the weaver.
There will be no employment for anyone except in doing things that must be done on the spot, such as unpacking and distributing the imports, ministering to the proprietors as domestic servants, or by acting, preaching, paving, lighting, housebuilding, and the rest; and some of these, as the capitalist comes to regard ostentation as vulgar, and to enjoy a simpler life, will employ fewer and fewer people.
Nothing could have been simpler, but it was the arrival of a new idea in the business world.
Some private individual -- a Pentagon whose name is variously reported -- having casually discovered the constituents of the simpler colours and a rudimentary method of painting, is said to have begun decorating first his house, then his slaves, then his Father, his Sons, and Grandsons, lastly himself.
The fact that Barsoomian architecture is extremely ornate made the feat much simpler than I had anticipated, since I found ornamental ledges and projections which fairly formed a perfect ladder for me all the way to the eaves of the building.
For this reason I have chosen one of his simpler poems as a specimen.
So nothing could be simpler and more natural: meeting Hetty was a mere circumstance of his walk, not its object.
Suppose you have said to your friend "You are better to-day," and that you want him to understand that you are asking him a question, what can be simpler than just to make a "?