rigor mortis


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rigor

 [rig´or, ri´gor]
1. a chill; rigidity.
2. strict discipline or scrupulous adherence to a given set of standards.
rigor mor´tis the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.

rig·or mor·'tis

stiffening of the body, 1-7 hours after death, from hardening of the muscular tissues as a consequence of the coagulation of the myosinogen and paramyosinogen; it disappears after 1-6 days or when decomposition begins.

rigor mortis

(môr′tĭs)
n.
Muscular stiffening following death.
Stiffness of a cadaver. The following are crude approximations of the time of death, based on temperature and presence/absence of rigor
warm and flaccid < 3 hours
warm and stiff 3-8 hours
cold and stiff 8-36 hours
cold and flaccid > 36 hours

rigor mortis

Post-mortem corporal rigidity, stiff stiffness Pathology Board-like contraction of skeletal muscles that first appears in jaw and other short muscles–eg, of hand, 2-4 hrs after death; RM later appears on the trunk and extremities, peaks at 24-48 hrs; it disappears in the same order as it developed. Cf Livor mortis.

rig·or mor·tis

(rī'gōr mōr'tis)
Stiffening of the body, from 1-7 hours after death, from hardening of the muscular tissues in consequence of the coagulation of the myosinogen and paramyosinogen; it disappears after 1-6 days, or when decomposition begins.
Synonym(s): postmortem rigidity.

rigor mortis

The stiffening of muscles which occurs after death as a result of the loss of ATP so that the cross bridges cannot disconnect from actin. Rigor usually starts about 3 or 4 hours after death and is usually complete in about 12 hours. It may start much earlier, sometimes almost immediately, if the subject was engaged in strenuous activity or was fevered or suffering convulsions before death. It passes off as enzymes break down and soften the muscles over the course of the next 2 or 3 days.

rigor mortis

the temporary stiffening of a body after death.

rig·or mor·tis

(rig'ŏr mōr'tis)
Stiffening of the body, from 1-7 hours after death, due to hardening of the muscular tissues in consequence of the coagulation of the myosinogen and paramyosinogen.
Synonym(s): postmortem rigidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ATP values decreased according to the increase in the storage period, until this variation becomes almost constant; however, the opposite is observed for the AMP nucleotide, precisely at the end of rigor mortis. The variations reported for ATP, ADP, AMP and IMP are in figure 4.
As in our study, a higher degree of rigor mortis was found in pigs with higher levels of blood lactate (Warriss et al., 2003a).
ATP is responsible for muscular shortening and contraction in rigor mortis. Simple shocking allows tenderizing to begin well before the normal 36-hour waiting period.
ANDREW BELL, Head of Research, Rensburg SheppardsRecovery is weak, but anaemia is better than rigor mortis
"Do you know what rigor mortis is?" Sanders kindly asked his young questioner.
To test whether rigor mortis could have deformed ancient remains, the researchers examined the movement of large, dying birds at a raptor-care center.
When initially recovered from the water, portions of the body--mainly hands and arms--may appear to be in full rigor mortis, even though only a short time has passed since death occurred.
Reducing the on-the-bone chilling time normally interferes with the process of rigor mortis, making the meat tough and chewy when cooked.
Reducing on-the-bone chilling time interferes with the process of rigor mortis, making cooked meat tough and chewy.
As hard hitting as a double-shot of bourbon, only someone with rigor mortis could fail to be moved by this.
Up to this point there has been a gradual development of character interaction, but after this scene a kind of social rigor mortis sets in.
One person became another's baggage in a series of lifts in which the liftee was suspended in rigor mortis under the arm of the lifter.