rigor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rigor

 [rig´or, ri´gor]
1. a chill; rigidity.
2. strict discipline or scrupulous adherence to a given set of standards.
rigor mor´tis the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigor

/rig·or/ (rig´er) [L.] chill; rigidity.
rigor mor´tis  the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.

rigor

(rĭg′ər)
n.
1.
a. Strictness or severity, as in action or judgment: "The desert fostered a closed world of faith and rigor and harsh judgment: almost every decision here could have lethal consequences" (Jeffrey Tayler).
b. A harsh or trying circumstance; a hardship or difficulty: the rigors of working in a coal mine.
c. Archaic A harsh or severe act.
2.
a. Strictness in adhering to standards or a method; exactitude: "To study the brain with scientific rigor, behaviorists logically restricted their experiments to ones in which the brain was the source of measurable effects" (Robert Pollack).
b. A standard or exacting requirement, as of a field of study: the intellectual rigors of advanced mathematics.
3. Medicine Shivering or trembling, as caused by a chill.
4. Physiology A state of rigidity in living tissues or organs that prevents response to stimuli.
5. Obsolete Stiffness or rigidity.

rigor

[rig′ər]
Etymology: L, stiffness
1 a rigid condition of the body tissues, as in rigor mortis.
2 a violent attack of shivering that may be associated with chills and fever.
Stiffness of a cadaver. The following are crude approximations of the time of death, based on temperature and presence/absence of rigor
warm and flaccid < 3 hours
warm and stiff 3-8 hours
cold and stiff 8-36 hours
cold and flaccid > 36 hours

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigor

A violent attack of shivering causing a rapid rise in body temperature.

rigor

a subjective sensation of feeling cold, accompanied by muscle tremor, characteristic of the increment stage of fever. Because of its subjectivity it is not a term that can be used in animal medicine.

rigor complexes
formed when actin and myosin bond together strongly in the absence of ATP; occurs in rigor mortis.
rigor mortis
the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.
References in classic literature ?
With increasing rigor has the jeddak of Manator persecuted the slaves from Gathol since he took to himself the unwilling Princess Haja.
His muscles were set as hard as a board in the most exaggerated rigor mortis, while the contraction of the fibres had drawn his mouth into a hard sardonic grin.
Of course, there were exceptions to this; and, such was the rigor of his discipline, that if he had a dinner or a conference before him in which, in a business way, he encountered enemies or allies and planned or prosecuted campaigns, he abstained from drinking.
They are in a state of extreme contraction, far exceeding the usual rigor mortis.
This law, fatal, of course, to the writing as well as the acting of plays, was enforced with only slightly relaxing rigor until very shortly before the Restoration of Charles II in
Her rigidity was frightful, like the rigor of a corpse galvanized into harsh speech and glittering stare by the force of murderous hate.
Tom was gradually allowed to shuffle through his lessons with less rigor, and having Philip to help him, he was able to make some show of having applied his mind in a confused and blundering way, without being cross-examined into a betrayal that his mind had been entirely neutral in the matter.
It may be that you have discovered, before this, that the rigors of military law and custom melt insensibly away and disappear when a soldier or a regiment or the garrison wants to do something that will please Cathy.
I had speedy proofs that the excellent abbe was engaged in my behalf, for the rigors of my imprisonment were alleviated by many trifling though acceptable indulgences, and I was told that my trial was to be postponed to the assizes following those now being held.
His majesty wished to speak to you, you refused him an interview; why, now that you are face to face, that you are here by a force independent of your will, why do you confine yourself to rigors which I consider useless and absurd?
For days they suffered the doleful rigors and retchings of sea-sickness, lurking below in their berths in squalid state, or emerging now and then like spectres from the hatchways, in capotes and blankets, with dirty nightcaps, grizzly beard, lantern visage and unhappy eye, shivering about the deck, and ever and anon crawling to the sides of the vessel, and offering up their tributes to the windward, to infinite annoyance of the captain.
Then I saw how these people combated the rigors of the arctic, and lived in luxury and comfort in the midst of a land of perpetual ice.