rigor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rigor

 [rig´or, ri´gor]
1. a chill; rigidity.
2. strict discipline or scrupulous adherence to a given set of standards.
rigor mor´tis the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rigor

(rĭg′ər)
n.
1.
a. Strictness or severity, as in action or judgment: "The desert fostered a closed world of faith and rigor and harsh judgment: almost every decision here could have lethal consequences" (Jeffrey Tayler).
b. A harsh or trying circumstance; a hardship or difficulty: the rigors of working in a coal mine.
c. Archaic A harsh or severe act.
2.
a. Strictness in adhering to standards or a method; exactitude: "To study the brain with scientific rigor, behaviorists logically restricted their experiments to ones in which the brain was the source of measurable effects" (Robert Pollack).
b. A standard or exacting requirement, as of a field of study: the intellectual rigors of advanced mathematics.
3. Medicine Shivering or trembling, as caused by a chill.
4. Physiology A state of rigidity in living tissues or organs that prevents response to stimuli.
5. Obsolete Stiffness or rigidity.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Stiffness of a cadaver. The following are crude approximations of the time of death, based on temperature and presence/absence of rigor
warm and flaccid < 3 hours
warm and stiff 3-8 hours
cold and stiff 8-36 hours
cold and flaccid > 36 hours
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rigor

A violent attack of shivering causing a rapid rise in body temperature.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Rigors Digital Experience Monitoring & Optimization Platform combines the power of deeply customizable synthetic monitoring solution with an optimization engine that scans against nearly 300 most common performance defects, showing users what to fix, while prioritizing them by severity with recommendations on how to fix them, just in time for the holiday code freeze.
The reason for the lack of rigor, according to the NCTQ report, is that students in education programs are given too many "criterion-deficient assignments." Walsh says this type of assignment is too subjective, and asks students to only give opinions--not to demonstrate mastery of specific skills.
This study used nine matrices to analyze three semesters of faculty course evaluations and surveys in order to examine the relationship between perceived course rigor, anticipated and earned final grades, faculty accessibility and support, and the amount of time students spent outside the classroom preparing for class.
The Academic Roadmap caused shifts in established curricula, leading many academics and administrators to question "the rigor" of experiential education.
Mike Scaccia, the guitarist for heavy metal bands Ministry and Rigor Mortis, has died aged 47 after collapsing on stage.
Blackburn, a former teacher and principal who works as an educational consultant, speaker, and workshop presenter, shows teachers, principals, curriculum specialists, and professional development coordinators how to increase the level of rigor in classrooms by creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, is supported to do so, and demonstrates learning at high levels, arguing that the power to make a difference lies in the hands of the teacher.
The trials had different degrees of rigor (low, medium, or high) and three different types of disclosures (drug-company funding, funding by the National Institutes of Health, or no disclosed funding).
Traditionally, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners have perceived a tension between rigor and accessibility in quantitative research and evaluation in postsecondary education.